There are some amazing events on tap all over the world, all the time. Here’s a taste of what you can see and do in July:

  • It’s not too late to join in on the madness at the 2014 FIFA World Cup (June 12-July 13) in cities across Brazil. The semi finals, which kick off on July 4th, lead up to a final showdown on July 13th, when one team will be crowned the world champion. Which nation will take home the cup? Be there to find out!
  • See Lake Geneva lit up in a blaze of color and lights–and set to music–at the culmination of one of Switzerland’s biggest events of the summer: the Fêtes de Genève (July 17-August 10). The month-long celebration includes free nightly concerts, carnival rides, hundreds of food stalls representing a “world tour of flavors,” and unique arts and crafts visitors can take home as souvenirs. 
  • Don your red, white, and blue to celebrate America’s birthday in the city most closely associated with its independence–Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. At the Fourth of July Jam, live music, an all-day parade, and an explosive fireworks display turn this historic landmark into a giant party that’s perfect for the whole family. 
  • Did someone say revolution–and red, white, and blue? Commemorate the start of the French Revolution on Bastille Day (July 14) in Paris, France. A military parade on the Champs-Elyseés, free entry to the Louvre, balls at local fire stations, and stunning pyrotechnics make Paris the place to be on this spirited national holiday. 

    Fireworks burst over the Eiffel Tower on Bastille Day. (Photograph by un_photo, Flickr)

    Fireworks burst over the Eiffel Tower on Bastille Day. (Photograph by un_photo, Flickr)

  • Turn your eyes to the skies during the annual Bali Kite Festival (July 18-20) in Sanur, Bali. The friendly competition between local villages features thousands of handmade kites battling it out in a number of categories. When not looking up in amazement, attendees can indulge in local music, food, and drink.
  • Get your groove on at one of Australia’s most beloved music festivals, Splendour in the Grass (July 25-27). Art installations, crafting workshops, and a children’s festival–not to mention a standout lineup that includes Outkast, Lily Allen, and Kelis–make this Gold Coast extravaganza the can’t-miss occasion of the season.
  • Travel to paradise to celebrate traditional Polynesian culture at Heiva | Tahiti (July 3-19). This hip-shaking festival provides a spectacular showcase for Tahitian dancing–once forbidden to suppress local culture–as well as sports and games with ancient roots, such as stone lifting, javelin throwing, and fruit carrying.  

    An aerial shot of dancers at the Heiva | Tahiti festival in Papeete, the capital of French Polynesia. (Photograph by tahitipix, Flickr)

    An aerial shot of dancers at the Heiva | Tahiti festival in Papeete, the capital of French Polynesia. (Photograph by tahitipix, Flickr)

  • New England’s most famous crustacean will be front and center at the 67th annual Maine Lobster Festival (July 30-August 2) in the coastal city of Rockland. Live music, a big parade, lobster crate races, and a cooking contest round out this five-day feast, which serves up more than ten tons of lobster each year. 
  • Get ready for some good, clean fun–or not so much–at the Boryeong Mud Festival (July 18-27) in Boryeong, South Korea. Join two million festival goers on Daecheon beach to frolic in the local mineral-rich mud accompanied by an eclectic live soundtrack. Ski, slide, or wrestle–but make sure to get your dirt on in some way, or you’ll be sent to “mud prison.”
  • Carthage has been a crossroads of culture since ancient times. Learn more about modern-day Tunisia through the lens of performance at the Carthage International Festival (July 10-August 16). You won’t want to miss musicians, dancers, and thespians from Africa’s northernmost country–along with artists from around the world–as they take to the stage of a restored Roman amphitheater for weeks of live shows.

What would you add to the list? Let us know what we’re missing by leaving a comment.

Comments

  1. Chris
    http://visitors.blogg.se
    June 27, 11:05 pm

    Went to the party in Geneve last year. Really nice

  2. Ishbel Imrie
    Kemnay, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
    June 28, 1:22 pm

    Commonwealth Games, Glasgow

  3. kerry dexter
    June 28, 3:09 pm

    I’d add the Hebridean Celtic Festival (HebCelt for short) mid July in Stornoway, Isle of Lewis, Western Isles, Scotland. Celtic music from the isles and from all over the world

  4. Tarun Aggarwal
    June 30, 6:45 am

    you are missing “The Calgary Stampede” held in July every year.

  5. Pieter Gent
    Durban South Africa
    July 10, 11:29 am

    Don’t forget the largest airshow in the world. The Experimental Aircraft Associations annual convention at Oshkosh, Wisconsin. A week of aviation activities with over 500 000 visitors and ten percent of the world’s light aircraft on one field.

  6. Shelly Willis
    Choctaw, MS 39350
    July 10, 2:59 pm

    The annual Choctaw Indian Fair (Typically the 2nd/3rd week in July). This Year July 9th – July 12th, 2014
    Includes:
    Daily Chief’s Hour at 6 pm
    Choctaw Princess Pageant (Wed night)
    Traditional Tribal Dancers (Daily)
    Choctaw Stickball Tournament (Daily – Championship game Sat night)
    Choctaw Cultural – Arts & Crafts (Beadwork, Baskets, Clothing, etc.) (Daily)
    Traditional Choctaw Food (Daily)
    Musical Entertainment and Carnival Games and Rides (Daily)

  7. Ally Stoltz
    Papua New Guinea
    July 10, 3:34 pm

    Rabaul Mask Festival July 2014!

    Date: 16/07/2014
    Finish Date: 20/07/2014

    Mask Festival

    The National Mask Festival was initially introduced in 1995 and is staged as an Annual National Event to promote the Mask Cultures of Papua New Guinea.

    The annual Warwagira Mask Festival will take place along the beautiful volcanic shores of Kokopo, East New Britain Province on the 16th – 20th July, 2014.

    The festival begins with the haunting arrival of the Kinavai beginning at about 5am – the only time ‘tubuans’ can appear, which is always at the break of dawn. The ‘Kinavai’ represents the arrival of the feared ‘tubuans’ who arrive amidst the chanting and beating of kundu drums by elders and initiated young men on canoes, thus marking the beginning of the Warwagira Mask Festival.

    The ‘tubuans’ are revered ancestral spirits of the ‘Tolai’ people of East New Britain. Traditionally the arrival of the tubuans meant that shell money was to be paid for broken taboos.

    Traditional masks will be on display during the festival – some many decades old, brought over from New Ireland Province and other parts of Papua New Guinea. Many of these masks are sacred and are not meant to be viewed or transported to alien places, hence the ceremonial ‘kinavai’ which acts as a cleansing or appeasement ritual for the broken taboos and to pay respects to the Tolai people of East New Britain.

    Most of the masks on display are from the New Ireland province, which the Tolai people claim their lineage thousands of years ago.

    Part of the festival includes the spectacular Baining Fire Dance from the Tolai’s of the mainland of East New Britain province. In this night-time traditional dance, initiated young men perform harrowing dances through blazing fires amidst evocative chanting by their elders.

    Read more about last year’s 2013 Warwagira Mask Festival.

    For further information regarding the Warwagira Mask Festival contact: pngmaskfestivalsec@gmail.com

    For bookings contact
    kokopobeachbungalow@global.net.pg or phone: (+675) 982 8789 / 982 8788 / 982 8961

  8. Michyl Culos
    France
    July 12, 1:51 pm

    This is a great round-up, thanks! I would add in the Tour de France finish on the Champs Elysee in Paris. Here is more info also on Bastille Day (July 14th) in Paris for those interested! http://www.parisianist.com/en/attractions/annual-events/bastille+day/