Christopher Elliott

of National Geographic Traveler

Christopher Elliott serves as resident consumer advocate for National Geographic Traveler and writes the "Problem Solved" column for the magazine.

Follow Christopher's story on Twitter @elliottdotorg, on Linked In, and on his personal website.

National Geographic Traveler Editor at Large Christopher Elliott is the magazine’s consumer advocate and ombudsman. Over the past 15 years he has helped countless readers fix their trips. Here’s his latest advice.

National Geographic Traveler Editor at Large Christopher Elliott is the magazine’s consumer advocate and ombudsman. Over the past 15 years he has helped countless readers fix their trips. Here’s his latest advice.

National Geographic Traveler Editor at Large Christopher Elliott is the magazine’s consumer advocate and ombudsman. Over the past 15 years he has helped countless readers fix their trips. Here’s his latest advice.

National Geographic Traveler Editor at Large Christopher Elliott is the magazine’s consumer advocate and ombudsman. Over the past 15 years he has helped countless readers fix their trips. Here’s his latest advice.

National Geographic Traveler Editor at Large Christopher Elliott is the magazine’s consumer advocate and ombudsman. Over the past 15 years he has helped countless readers fix their trips. Here’s his latest advice.

Too often, your well-being on the road is an afterthought to trip planning–a hastily packed bottle of aspirin or an inattentive glance at your health insurance card to make sure you’re covered. It shouldn’t be. A lot can go wrong when you’re traveling. Fortunately, most of it is preventable. Here are quick tips to help you determine when to go full-steam ahead–and when to stay home.

National Geographic Traveler Editor at Large Christopher Elliott is the magazine’s consumer advocate and ombudsman. Over the past 15 years he has helped countless readers fix their trips. Here’s his latest advice.

Traveler Editor at Large Christopher Elliott is the magazine’s consumer advocate and ombudsman. Over the past 15 years he has helped countless readers fix their trips. Here’s his latest advice.

Traveler Editor at Large Christopher Elliott is the magazine’s consumer advocate and ombudsman. Over the past 15 years he has helped countless readers fix their trips. Here’s his latest advice…

Reader Question: Can kids still travel on a parent’s lap for free?

National Geographic Traveler Editor at Large Christopher Elliott, the magazine’s consumer advocate and ombudsman, has helped countless readers fix their trips over the past 15 years. Here’s his latest advice.

National Geographic Traveler Editor at Large Christopher Elliott, the magazine’s consumer advocate and ombudsman, has helped countless readers fix their trips over the past 15 years. Here’s his latest advice.

Tips for getting around overpriced holiday airfares this year from National Geographic Traveler’s resident consumer advocate and guru, Christopher Elliott.

If you want better customer service on your next trip — and who doesn’t? — then reach for your pocket.

But don’t bother pulling out your platinum card to impress a ticket agent, or a crisp bill to tip your bellhop. Whip out your wireless device instead.

It’s become a rite of summer on local news programs: a hysteria-inducing hotel bedbug epidemic story. The teary tales of vacations ruined, the zooms on the red welts, and the infographic of the life cycle of the tiny invaders makes them sound like villains in a summer blockbuster. It makes for must-see TV, but what to believe? Christopher Elliott exterminates some of the common misconceptions.

The American family vacation needs an overhaul. Once the best opportunity for enrichment and education as well as much needed R&R, today it’s often a dysfunctional, unhealthy, sense-dulling waste of time and money, typically enabled and abetted by an unimaginative travel industry. Here’s how to bring back the good.

Flying can feel like torture. Flash points include seat territory disputes, scuffles over luggage space, and arguments about unruly kids.

Here’s how to short-circuit five common midair melees…

If you think pulling together a complex trip is the kind of organizational nightmare that’ll make you feel like you’re in a bad remake of a “National Lampoon’s Vacation” movie — don’t worry.

Here are a few strategies we picked up along the way…

Family. Travel.

Those two words are enough to make the average reader click away. But they shouldn’t be.

If you close your eyes and imagine Kauai, you might see jagged peaks plunging into hidden rainforest valleys, beaches with impossibly blue waves thundering ashore, and of course, endless summer weather.

But that’s not all there is to it. Behind that postcard facade there’s a funky island that your kids can connect with. Ours did.

Maui is for honeymooners. And, let’s be honest: the last thing these newlyweds want is for everything to be ruined by someone else’s kids. But there’s a whole other side to this luxe island waiting to be discovered — if you pay close attention.

If you associate Hawaii with Mai Tais, luaus, and colorful shirts, you’ve probably never been to the Big Island. None of those cliches resonate on what we like to call the real Hawaii. Even though it’s one of the least-visited islands in the Aloha State, the Big Island (also known as Hawaiʻi Island) is far more exciting, and, at times, more dangerous.

Congratulations, sir. Surely you’ve got plenty on your plate. But I’d like to say something on behalf of travelers. Though we may not have a huge army of lobbyists on K Street, we could still use a little love during your upcoming term. We are the underappreciated engine that drives a $1.9 trillion business in…

Which place is better, Maui or the North Shore of Oahu? You tell us.

When it comes to fall foliage drives, New England gets all the attention – some of it undeserved. And if you’re traveling with children who are easily distracted (like we are), a simple trip along Vermont’s winding roads just won’t cut it. A never-ending chorus of “oohs” and “ahhs” from the adults will only reinforce your kids’ belief that foliage tours are for fuddy-duddies. That’s why we turned our sights on the great American West.

Staying in an older vacation rental can be a real adventure. And we know, because we’ve lived in a few of them during our year-long trip across the United States. A historical home can bring you closer to a city’s traditional downtown area, or to real residents. It can even help you feel like you’re a local.

But historical homes have, well…histories.