Emily Haile

The Key to Recycling

A printing company has come up with an alternative to those ubiquitous plastic hotel keys: biodegradable, paperboard keys that guests can recycle after their stay. Green Key bills itself as economical, eco-friendly, and sanitary (you’re not getting the same grimy key that’s been used by umpteen guests). So far, parent company The Whitehall Group has…

Just a few miles from the town of Price in central Utah lies Nine Mile Canyon, home to the greatest concentration of rock art in the United States, according to the Bureau of Land Management. Though there are few facilities, adventurous visitors can drive the 78-mile Nine Mile Canyon Back Country Byway to see the…

Paintings Below Zero

Any talk of visiting Chicago in February may seem like a cruel joke to travelers, but the Windy City’s taking advantage of its chilly weather to present a public art project that wouldn’t be possible in, say, the Grenadines. Canadian artist Gordon Halloran‘s “Paintings Below Zero” is the centerpiece of the Museum of Modern Ice…

Patchwork Tourism

  A patchwork of color is popping up on historic barns all over the country, and the trend is a boon for rural tourism. Our friends at American Style report on the grassroots art movement of barn quilts: Colorfully painted quilt squares have appeared on barns throughout eastern Kentucky, often representing traditional, local patterns. The…

Cause a Scene

One man was tying his shoe. Another was looking at a map. They were just a few of the more than 200 “undercover agents” for the group Improv Everywhere to freeze in place on the Main Concourse at Grand Central Terminal. The result was a human art installation: Frozen Grand Central. For five full minutes…

Gaga for the Grenadines

It’s cold as anything here in the nation’s capital and we’re dreaming of unspoiled Caribbean beaches, so we’d like to give a shout out to the Grenadines. While some sustainable-tourism panelists argued that cruise culture is taking its toll on the island chain, the Grenadines scored a decent 77 on our Destinations Rated: Islands survey,…

The 1.5-mile wide Mendenhall Glacier may be just around the corner, but you’ll be plenty warm at Juneau’s Westmark Baranof Hotel. The 196-room hotel, owned by Holland America, combines vegetable oil with fuel oil to heat the hotel. The hotel is the only place in the city that collects used cooking oil. The ingenious process…

Culinary Trailblazing

Natchitoches, Louisiana is famous for its meat pies. It’s also where the movie Steel Magnolias was filmed. We’ve been excited to see of a growing number of states promoting tourism through culinary trails. These tours offer a “taste” of each region’s recipes, and are quickly cropping up across the country. In Indiana, a state where…

Ride on the Peace Train

It’s no longer just Cat Stevens “dreaming about the world as one.” IT recently came across an organization with a mission “based on a vision of the world’s largest industry, travel and tourism – becoming the world’s first global peace industry; and the belief that every traveler is potentially an ‘Ambassador for Peace’.” Founded more…

Endangered Places: How You Can Help

The National Trust for Historic Preservation’s list of the Most Endangered Places of 2007, is a surprising amalgam of old and new, from historic motels along Route 66 to a racecourse in Florida. Here are just a few of the threatened sites and some ideas on what travelers and concerned citizens can do to offset…

Art Lover’s Destination Guide

We’d never heard of it until today, but American Style, “the premier arts lifestyle magazine for art lovers, collectors and travelers,” has a lot of nifty content for the discerning wanderer. Each issue lists hundreds of arts festivals, gallery openings and museum events nationwide. We got a sneak peek at their February 2008 issue, in…

Lemurs, Zebras, and Toads, Oh My!

This month the Association of Zoos and Aquariums announced the conservation highlights of the past year. Here are some of our favorite stories: The Madagascar Fauna Group and the Duke Lemur Center hatched a plan to transplant zoo-born ruffed lemurs to the Betampona Natural Reserve in Madagascar. Three American zoos provided lemurs: Hogle Zoo in…

NatureAir: The Zero Emissions Airline

NatureAir dubs itself as the world’s first and only zero emissions airline. Carbon neutral since 2004, the Costa Rican airline combats deforestation by paying local landowners to preserve threatened portions of the jungle. In the past four years, the company says they’ve offset 20,000 tons of carbon dioxide by saving about 500 acres in the…

A French Christmas Recipe

I learned at a young age that starting international or multicultural holiday traditions can be fun (and delicious). Every Christmas, my Russian great-aunt, who taught high school French in New York City for years, used to bake a bûche de Noël, the traditional French “Yule log” cake. Starting back in the 12th century, the French…

Baltimore’s Miracle on 34th Street

I grew up in Charm City, the town in which many of director John Waters’ ingenious films are based. Anyone that’s ever visited Baltimore’s Hampden neighborhood (the self-proclaimed “home of big hair”) will tell you the area’s brimming with characters. Never is this more evident than during the holiday season. For as long as I…

The Rose of New England

I spent last week in Norwich, Connecticut visiting my sister, niece, and nephew. I soon learned that Norwich often lives in the shadow of its more glamorous neighbor, Mystic, about 30 minutes to the south. And though my two-year-old niece adores the belugas at the Mystic Aquarium, my sister and I were hoping for activities…

Hopped Up in Chicago

Chicago was recently named the most caffeinated city in the country. In light of this, we figured they must know a thing or two about coffee. Plus, why should Seattle get all the props? We conferred with the Traveler staff and scoured Citysearch and Urbanspoon for some of the best java joints in the windy…

Biagio: Bacon for Dessert

“Have you had the bacon chocolate bar?” she whispered. We were strangers in the cafeteria line but we’d bonded over the crispy breakfast food. That’s how I found out about Biagio Fine Chocolate in Washington, D.C.’s Dupont Circle/Adams Morgan neighborhood. The next week I trudged there to buy Mo’s Bacon Bar ($7) by Chicago-based Vosges…

Chocolate to Power Trans-Saharan Journey

On November 23, a team of Brits began the “first ever carbon-negative driving expedition.” Andy Pag of London and John Grimshaw of Poole will drive their recycled BioTruck some 4,500 miles from the U.K. across the Sahara to Timbuktu in Mali, West Africa. The catch? Their truck runs on chocolate fuel. UK-based Ecotec has “developed…

Looking for a winter weekend getaway that’s au naturale? The Appalachian Mountain Club is launching a set of naturalist-led snowshoeing and cross-country skiing trips in the White Mountains of New Hampshire.  Excursions are available for all skill levels; one of the treks is specially designed for families with kids aged ten or older. Spend a…

Crete’s Still Kickin’

Our friends at Gadling recently pointed out that the top-ranking islands on Traveler’s latest Destinations Rated survey (Denmark’s Faroe Islands, Portugal’s Azores, Lofoten in Norway) aren’t very well known or highly visited. That’s certainly true, given that the tourist traps of Ibiza and St. John in the U.S. Virgin Islands scored predictably low. The 522…

TSA Amends Sikh Screening Policy

After an outcry from Sikh and other religious groups, the United States Transportation Security Administration altered its policy for screening airport passengers with head coverings last week. First implemented last August, the controversial policy mandated that cowboy hats, berets, and turbans require additional screening such as removal or pat down—regardless of whether not a metal…

New York’s Slow Revolution

The dizzying Manhattan restaurant scene just got a little bit calmer. Slow Food NYC, a branch of Slow Food International, has come up with a way to recognize local establishments who embody the Slow Food ideals of quality, authenticity, and sustainability. Restaurants, bars, and markets that meet their standards are given the Snail of Approval,…

Big Wheels Keep on Turnin’

Irv Gordon breaks a world record every time he gets behind the wheel of his 1966 Volvo P1800. The 67-year-old retired teacher has clocked more than 2 million miles (2,593,831 as of this writing) on the car…and he’s still driving it. He’s got the Guinness world record for “most miles driven by a single owner…

Biking (and eating) Providence

Many people visit Providence, Rhode Island, to tour the local colleges or make a pit stop on their way to Boston. But for those who live there, P-town is a diverse, laid-back city full of restaurants with character, Victorian architecture, peaceful hiking trails, and aspiring artists. Plus, it also happens to be an extremely pedestrian-…