Intelligent Travel

About Intelligent Travel

Cultural, Authentic & Sustainable: This is your brain on travel. We showcase the essence of place, what's unique and original, and what locals cherish most about where they live. And we highlight places, practices, and people that are on the front lines of sustainable travel--travel that preserves places' essential uniqueness for future generations.

Our mission is rooted in what the National Geographic Society stands for: inspiring people to care about the planet. Traveler and Intelligent Travel also want you to experience and enjoy the planet. We want to help you journey with greater sensitivity to the impact your trip has on a place and its inhabitants.

Sometimes we celebrate, sometimes we criticize. But we always try to heighten awareness about what's really important about travel: finding great places, experiencing them fully, and leaving them no worse for your visit.

Email: intelligenttravel at ngs dot org

‘Tis the Season: The Best American Ciders

Hard cider, a popular alcoholic beverage in colonial America, is on everyone’s lips again, thanks to the classic cocktail resurgence, the “slow food” movement, and even the gluten-free trend. Giant brewers have all gotten involved, and cider-only bars from Seattle to New York City are cropping up. Here’s where to savor the best adult apple juice across the United States.

Europe’s Rising Star: Bordeaux

Visitors once just glanced over this UNESCO-listed city’s stately 18th-century squares and harmonious architecture before heading out of town. Now there are plenty of reasons to linger in Bordeaux.

Garden State Variety: Road Tripping New Jersey

New Jersey is more than a shore thing: There’s a lot to love about the Garden State.

Twitter Chat: Life-Changing Trips

Join National Geographic and G Adventures for a Twitter chat about life-changing travel from 2-3 p.m. ET on Friday, October 2.

Just Back: Queenstown, New Zealand

National Geographic Creative photographer Jill Schneider (on Instagram @jillhsphotography) teaches travel photography to high school students as a National Geographic Student Expeditions trip leader. She recently returned from Queenstown, a resort town on New Zealand’s South Island known as the “Adventure Capital of the World.” Here are some of the highlights from Jill’s trip, in her own words: Biggest selling…

World Calendar: Must-Attend Events in October

There are some amazing events on tap all over the world, all the time. Here’s a taste of what you can see and do in October.

8 Adventures in Wonderland

Don’t just see the world, seize it. From swimming with whale sharks in Baja California to horseback riding across Mongolia, these eight wild adventures turn vacations into calls to action.

Australia’s Great Ocean Road

The Great Ocean Road is one of the only scenic drives in the world that can claim a mix of rugged scenery, some of Earth’s tallest trees, sea stacks of towering rock, and surfers. But marsupial wildlife as prebreakfast comic relief? Well played, Australia.

Just Back: Burgundy

Senior Travel Books Editor Barbara A. Noe visited the Burgundy region of France as part of research for the upcoming National Geographic book “Romantic Journeys of a Lifetime.” Here are some of the high points of her trip, in her own words.

Europe’s Rising Star: Split

Perched on a stocky peninsula jutting out from Croatia’s mainland, Split came to prominence thanks to the emperor Diocletian, who built an enormous palace here as his retirement project.

Finding Old Bavaria in Munich

For all its progressive thinking, Munich tends to look to the past when it comes to lifestyle. The capital of meat-eating, beer-swilling Bavaria is a place where dinner takes the shape of knödel dumplings and pig’s trotters, washed down with local beers by the liter. And although the residents ham it up for Oktoberfest (September 19-October…

An Insider’s Guide to Australia’s Great Ocean Road

Victoria’s best known highway, the Great Ocean Road, runs 150 miles from Torquay to near Warrnambool, but the scenic drive continues along the Victoria coast to the South Australia state line. Drive it the other way, from west to east, to parallel the route of 19th-century shipborne immigrants. Here’s a brief guide to maximizing your time on Australia’s rugged southeastern coast.