Leslie Trew Magraw

of National Geographic Travel

Leslie Trew Magraw is editor/producer for the Intelligent Travel blog network at National Geographic. Follow her story on Twitter @leslietrew and on Instagram @leslietrew.

Traveler’s 30-year history coincides, roughly, with the rise of travel as a widespread phenomenon. As we celebrate the magazine’s anniversary, I asked a dozen movers and shakers in the Nat Geo Travel family to share the biggest changes they’ve seen in the past three decades—and their hopes for the future. Here’s what they had to say.

With the changing of the seasons comes a change in where we as travelers set our sights on going. Inspired by our latest list of best fall trips, Nat Geo Travel staffers shared their own favorite autumn escapes. Here’s a dozen to get you dreaming about your next adventure, near or far.

On the lookout for a great escape? There’s nothing quite like an island to transport you to an alternate reality—one where days seem to stretch on forever and troubles fall away like an ebbing tide. Here are a few of the @NatGeoTravel team’s favorite islands to get you in that dreaming mood.

Amy Toensing, an American photojournalist committed to telling stories with sensitivity and depth, is known for her intimate essays about the lives of ordinary people. A regular contributor to National Geographic and National Geographic Traveler magazines, Toensing’s assignments have taken her all around the world, from the Jersey Shore to the remote jungles of Papua New Guinea. Here’s a look at the world through this award-winning photographer’s unique lens.

Is there a magic formula for the perfect beach town? No, but America could offer up more than a few candidates if they were doling out the title. Here are just a few of them, recommended by Nat Geo Travel staffers.

Pencil this in: National Geographic Travel‘s Offbeat Observer Robert Reid will be guest hosting our next live Twitter chat–at 12:30 p.m. ET on Tuesday, June 17.

I recently had the distinct pleasure of chatting with Kelly E. Carter, author of the new book “The Dog Lover’s Guide to Travel,” when she stopped by Nat Geo headquarters. “[Dogs] bring us such joy,” she said, “so how come they can’t go everywhere with us?” Good question. Find out more about the current state of pet travel and what dog-loving globetrotters have to look forward to in the future.

Dan Westergren is the director of photography for National Geographic Traveler. Though he had an early affinity for black and white photography, being responsible for a travel magazine’s photographic vision means Dan is, in his words, “surrounded by a rainbow riot of color digital images” on a daily basis. Beyond his exceptional eye for editing,…

In addition to being an editor at large at Traveler and the magazine’s chief book expert Don George has tackled everything from how travel keeps us young (and in love with the world) to a popular travel writing tips series for Intelligent Travel. Here’s your chance to pick his literary brain: Join us at 12:30 p.m. ET on Tuesday, May 13, for @NatGeoTravel’s latest Twitter chat. Use #TripLit to ask a question or to simply follow along.

Becoming a travel pro takes time–and lots of trial and error–but it’s not cheating to learn from the experiences of others. The folks at Nat Geo Travel know that as much as anyone. And while we have a lot of road miles under our belts, we’re students of the world, too. Here’s what we’ve learned so far.

Paul Theroux has been charming readers–and rooting out surprising adventures in far-flung places–for more than half a century. Known for his fondness for train travel, love-hate relationship with Africa, and finesse with language, the veteran travel writer and novelist, now 73, continues to share his adventures with the world. When Theroux stopped by the Nat Geo offices last year, I had a chance to ask him about his thoughts on travel, his connection to his roots, and his advice for aspiring writers. This is what he had to say.

I sat down with Don George, editor at large at National Geographic Traveler and author of Lonely Planet Guide to Travel Writing, and asked him why and how travel writing gets under our skin, who inspired him to become a travel writer in the first place, and what he thinks about the explosion of travel blogging and the future of the craft itself. Here’s what he had to say.

We publish new travel stories all the time on the Intelligent Travel blog network, but there are a few that really got your attention this year.

In case you missed them, here are the 13 most popular posts of 2013.

The staff at National Geographic Travel is always criss-crossing the globe to uncover the best and the brightest places, but we have travel wish lists just like everyone else. Here’s where we want to go in 2014 and why.

I sat down with Don George, editor at large at “National Geographic Traveler” magazine and author of “Lonely Planet Guide to Travel Writing,” and asked him to don (no pun intended) his editor’s cap and dispense some pearls of wisdom about what budding travel writers can do to make their work sing. This is what he had to say.

Seven score and 11 years after President Abraham Lincoln delivered one of the greatest speeches in American history, Gettysburg thrives on a folksy combination of winsome landscapes and rural panache. Here’s a local’s guide to the “most famous small town in America”—both on and off the battlefield.

I asked veteran travel writer and editor Don George about his plan of attack when he’s out on assignment in the field. Here’s what he had to say.

I asked veteran travel writer and editor Don George if he had any advice about how emerging storytellers can make their mark on the travel writing scene. Here’s what he had to say.

You’ve probably heard a lot about Millennials these days — from an ultimately positive review in “Time” to books on the subject with titles ranging from “Generation Me” to “How a New Generation is Remaking America.” While critics and scholars may quibble over the birth range associated with the generation, there’s no doubt that 25-year-old Millennial Trains Project founder Patrick Dowd belongs to this controversial cohort.

Travel is transforming the world, and not always for the better. Though it’s an uncomfortable reality (who doesn’t like to travel?), it’s something award-winning journalist Elizabeth Becker devoted five years of her life to investigating.

We publish new travel stories all the time on the Intelligent Travel blog, but there are a few that really got your attention this year.

In case you missed them, here are the 12 most popular blog posts of 2012.

Who doesn’t want to be a travel photographer and earn their keep by exploring the world and capturing its essence for the rest of us to see? I know I do.

I was lucky enough to sit in on one of Traveler’s photo seminars earlier this month, led by award-winning photographer Jim Richardson and the magazine’s senior photo editor Dan Westergren. Though Jim and Dan believe in the importance of technique, they stressed that “the secret is in how you look at the world, not in how you turn the dials on the camera.”

Here are a few of Jim and Dan’s tips on how to get into the right frame of mind when you’re making pictures.

The Radar: The top travel news, stories, trends, and ideas from across the web. Got Radar? Follow us on Twitter @NatGeoTraveler and tag your favorite travel stories from the Web #ngtradar. Check back on the blog for our roundups.

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A week before Thanksgiving Day in 1961, Michael Rockefeller, scion of one the most powerful families in U.S. history, decided to swim for shore after his boat capsized off the southwest coast of Dutch New Guinea.

He was never seen again.

Just because April 22nd has come and gone, it doesn’t mean that we’ve met our planet-caring quota for the year. Boston Bruin Andrew Ference – the self-described nature “geek”
responsible for greening the NHL and the star of Nat Geo’s new web series, “Beyond the Puck” – stopped by the Traveler offices to meet with our staff. We asked him to tell us about his favorite travel spots and how he tries to make Earth Day, every day — on and off the ice. This is what he had to say.