Leslie Trew Magraw

of National Geographic Travel

Leslie Trew Magraw is editor/producer for the Intelligent Travel blog network at National Geographic. Follow her story on Twitter @leslietrew and on Instagram @leslietrew.

Paul Theroux has been charming readers–and rooting out surprising adventures in far-flung places–for more than half a century. Known for his fondness for train travel, love-hate relationship with Africa, and finesse with language, the veteran travel writer and novelist, now 73, continues to share his adventures with the world. When Theroux stopped by the Nat Geo offices last year, I had a chance to ask him about his thoughts on travel, his connection to his roots, and his advice for aspiring writers. This is what he had to say.

I sat down with Don George, editor at large at National Geographic Traveler and author of Lonely Planet Guide to Travel Writing, and asked him why and how travel writing gets under our skin, who inspired him to become a travel writer in the first place, and what he thinks about the explosion of travel blogging and the future of the craft itself. Here’s what he had to say.

We publish new travel stories all the time on the Intelligent Travel blog network, but there are a few that really got your attention this year.

In case you missed them, here are the 13 most popular posts of 2013.

I sat down with Don George, editor at large at “National Geographic Traveler” magazine and author of “Lonely Planet Guide to Travel Writing,” and asked him to don (no pun intended) his editor’s cap and dispense some pearls of wisdom about what budding travel writers can do to make their work sing. This is what he had to say.

Seven score and ten years after President Lincoln delivered one of the greatest speeches in American history, Gettysburg thrives on a folksy combination of winsome landscapes and rural panache. Here’s a local’s guide to the “most famous small town in America” — both on and off the battlefield.

I asked veteran travel writer and editor Don George about his plan of attack when he’s out on assignment in the field. Here’s what he had to say.

I asked veteran travel writer and editor Don George if he had any advice about how emerging storytellers can make their mark on the travel writing scene. Here’s what he had to say.

You’ve probably heard a lot about Millennials these days — from an ultimately positive review in “Time” to books on the subject with titles ranging from “Generation Me” to “How a New Generation is Remaking America.” While critics and scholars may quibble over the birth range associated with the generation, there’s no doubt that 25-year-old Millennial Trains Project founder Patrick Dowd belongs to this controversial cohort.

Travel is transforming the world, and not always for the better. Though it’s an uncomfortable reality (who doesn’t like to travel?), it’s something award-winning journalist Elizabeth Becker devoted five years of her life to investigating.

We publish new travel stories all the time on the Intelligent Travel blog, but there are a few that really got your attention this year.

In case you missed them, here are the 12 most popular blog posts of 2012.

Who doesn’t want to be a travel photographer and earn their keep by exploring the world and capturing its essence for the rest of us to see? I know I do.

I was lucky enough to sit in on one of Traveler’s photo seminars earlier this month, led by award-winning photographer Jim Richardson and the magazine’s senior photo editor Dan Westergren. Though Jim and Dan believe in the importance of technique, they stressed that “the secret is in how you look at the world, not in how you turn the dials on the camera.”

Here are a few of Jim and Dan’s tips on how to get into the right frame of mind when you’re making pictures.

The Radar: The top travel news, stories, trends, and ideas from across the web. Got Radar? Follow us on Twitter @NatGeoTraveler and tag your favorite travel stories from the Web #ngtradar. Check back on the blog for our roundups.

A week before Thanksgiving Day in 1961, Michael Rockefeller, scion of one the most powerful families in U.S. history, decided to swim for shore after his boat capsized off the southwest coast of Dutch New Guinea.

He was never seen again.

Just because April 22nd has come and gone, it doesn’t mean that we’ve met our planet-caring quota for the year. Boston Bruin Andrew Ference – the self-described nature “geek”
responsible for greening the NHL and the star of Nat Geo’s new web series, “Beyond the Puck” – stopped by the Traveler offices to meet with our staff. We asked him to tell us about his favorite travel spots and how he tries to make Earth Day, every day — on and off the ice. This is what he had to say.

A great Valentine’s Day has as much to do with where you spend it as it does with the person you share it with. Here’s a list of a few of our favorite romantic movies of all time — and the cities that made them sing.