Meg Weaver

Red Alert: Flooding in the Peruvian Amazon

Though writer Robert Earle Howells adds greater fuel to our wanderlust fires with his round-up of five Peruvian jungle lodges in National Geographic Traveler’s new issue, now’s unfortunately not the time to visit the Amazon Basin. Super-floods continue to inundate the region — a situation that has been underreported in the English-language U.S. media so…

#FriFotos: Huli Wigmen Take New York

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This week’s #FriFotos* theme is EXOTIC, and New York City recently was the exotic playground for two visitors far, far away from home. To a Huli Wigman of Papua New Guinea, the streets of Manhattan have got to seem pretty exotic. And vice versa. Even among the blasé denizens of New York, the warriors manage…

Coffee Vacations

Most of us have heard of cooking vacations–trips that involve traveling to an idyllic place and taking cooking classes from a local chef or school. Last spring, Elizabeth Berg made us envious (and hungry) when she wrote about attending a cooking school along Italy’s Amalfi Coast. I piggybacked on that story and blogged about cooking…

Beyond Paris: Toulouse’s Modern Inspiration

Toulouse, France, located nearly 400 miles southwest of Paris, is known as the Ville Rose (the Pink City) as many of its buildings are made of reddish-pink bricks. On clear summer evenings when the sun descends, the city’s buildings blush. Though it’s an old city (the university here was founded in 1229 and the Romanesque…

Turn Right at Machu Picchu

July 24th marks the 100th anniversary of Hiram Bingham’s rediscovery of Machu Picchu, which awoke the world to the beauty and mystery of the “Lost City of the Inca.” Celebrations around the world are happening this summer to commemorate the centennial. Here at the National Geographic Society in Washington D.C., you’ll find a photo exhibit…

Five Summer Activities in Montpellier, France

Bastille Day is today, and  I’m daydreaming about the fabulous week I recently spent in the south of France. I fear that most Americans, when they dream of visiting France, get stuck on Paris. And while that’s all well and good, I urge my fellow countrymen and women to explore a few other French cities this…

Counterintuitive Geographic Facts and Other Minutiae

While vacationing with my family one summer in Cape May, New Jersey, my dad confidently asserted that contrary to what you might think, Cape May is actually farther south than Washington, D.C. He was proud to have unearthed this seemingly counterintuitive geographic fact. Being the fact hound that I am, I had to check it…

Traveler’s Guide to Xinjiang, Western China

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Former Traveler staffer Ashley Thompson is in western China. We emailed her to learn what she’s up to. Some of your status updates on Facebook mention seeing ram fights, Uyghur wrestling, and headless goat polo. Where are you and what are you doing there? My new roommate invited me along to watch traditional Nowruz (Central…

An Expat’s Valparaíso

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The Chilean port city of Valparaíso was a correct answer in this year’s big GeoBee competition and, back in 2009, it showed up twice in our November/December issue: We ranked it respectably in our annual Places Rated assessment and we wandered its hilly streets with writer Andrew Evans in the issue’s On Foot section. While…

Sledding in Hawaii?

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When I visited Hawaii’s Big Island last year, I stopped by the Hulihe’e Palace in Kailua-Kona, once the vacation residence of Hawaiian royalty. In one of its lovingly restored rooms, I spotted a diorama featuring what looked like a sled. A sled? In Hawaii? I was intrigued. Before the European missionaries arrived, he’e holua or…

Ten More Reasons Iceland is Astonishing

Iceland made headlines again this weekend after the eruption of the Grimsvotn volcano, which for many brought back memories of 2010’s Eyjafjallajokull eruption that grounded hundreds of thousands of flights in and out of Europe. For me it brought back memories of fact-checking Geotourism Editor Jonathan Tourtellot’s April 2011 feature “Life Atop a Cauldron.” Beyond…

We [Heart] NYC Songlines

In researching an upcoming project on the Big Apple, I stumbled upon editor and writer Jim Naureckas‘s New York City Songlines, a website packed with factual curiosities about Manhattan’s streets and sites. Naureckas has grafted his passion for NYC history onto the Australian Aboriginal concept of Songlines, songs used by Aborigines to navigate their homeland…