Meg Weaver

Though writer Robert Earle Howells adds greater fuel to our wanderlust fires with his round-up of five Peruvian jungle lodges in National Geographic Traveler’s new issue, now’s unfortunately not the time to visit the Amazon Basin. Super-floods continue to inundate the region — a situation that has been underreported in the English-language U.S. media so…

#FriFotos: Huli Wigmen Take New York

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This week’s #FriFotos* theme is EXOTIC, and New York City recently was the exotic playground for two visitors far, far away from home. To a Huli Wigman of Papua New Guinea, the streets of Manhattan have got to seem pretty exotic. And vice versa. Even among the blasé denizens of New York, the warriors manage…

Coffee Vacations

Most of us have heard of cooking vacations–trips that involve traveling to an idyllic place and taking cooking classes from a local chef or school. Last spring, Elizabeth Berg made us envious (and hungry) when she wrote about attending a cooking school along Italy’s Amalfi Coast. I piggybacked on that story and blogged about cooking…

Toulouse, France, located nearly 400 miles southwest of Paris, is known as the Ville Rose (the Pink City) as many of its buildings are made of reddish-pink bricks. On clear summer evenings when the sun descends, the city’s buildings blush. Though it’s an old city (the university here was founded in 1229 and the Romanesque…

Turn Right at Machu Picchu

July 24th marks the 100th anniversary of Hiram Bingham’s rediscovery of Machu Picchu, which awoke the world to the beauty and mystery of the “Lost City of the Inca.” Celebrations around the world are happening this summer to commemorate the centennial. Here at the National Geographic Society in Washington D.C., you’ll find a photo exhibit…

Bastille Day is today, and  I’m daydreaming about the fabulous week I recently spent in the south of France. I fear that most Americans, when they dream of visiting France, get stuck on Paris. And while that’s all well and good, I urge my fellow countrymen and women to explore a few other French cities this…

While vacationing with my family one summer in Cape May, New Jersey, my dad confidently asserted that contrary to what you might think, Cape May is actually farther south than Washington, D.C. He was proud to have unearthed this seemingly counterintuitive geographic fact. Being the fact hound that I am, I had to check it…

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Former Traveler staffer Ashley Thompson is in western China. We emailed her to learn what she’s up to. Some of your status updates on Facebook mention seeing ram fights, Uyghur wrestling, and headless goat polo. Where are you and what are you doing there? My new roommate invited me along to watch traditional Nowruz (Central…

An Expat’s Valparaíso

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The Chilean port city of Valparaíso was a correct answer in this year’s big GeoBee competition and, back in 2009, it showed up twice in our November/December issue: We ranked it respectably in our annual Places Rated assessment and we wandered its hilly streets with writer Andrew Evans in the issue’s On Foot section. While…

Sledding in Hawaii?

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When I visited Hawaii’s Big Island last year, I stopped by the Hulihe’e Palace in Kailua-Kona, once the vacation residence of Hawaiian royalty. In one of its lovingly restored rooms, I spotted a diorama featuring what looked like a sled. A sled? In Hawaii? I was intrigued. Before the European missionaries arrived, he’e holua or…

Iceland made headlines again this weekend after the eruption of the Grimsvotn volcano, which for many brought back memories of 2010’s Eyjafjallajokull eruption that grounded hundreds of thousands of flights in and out of Europe. For me it brought back memories of fact-checking Geotourism Editor Jonathan Tourtellot’s April 2011 feature “Life Atop a Cauldron.” Beyond…

We [Heart] NYC Songlines

In researching an upcoming project on the Big Apple, I stumbled upon editor and writer Jim Naureckas‘s New York City Songlines, a website packed with factual curiosities about Manhattan’s streets and sites. Naureckas has grafted his passion for NYC history onto the Australian Aboriginal concept of Songlines, songs used by Aborigines to navigate their homeland…

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This playful pic, an editors’ fav for Week 3, captures my mood on a spring Friday afternoon as the clock slogs toward 5 p.m.: just about time to flee the office and be a kid again. Of the shot, photographer Siew Yeong Yew tells us that the “late afternoon watering of the lawn at Parque…

We’ve been in touch with train buff, map-lover, and Fellow of the Royal Geographic Society Mark Ovenden to learn more about his latest book Railway Maps of the World. Please tell us a bit about the book. Is it about trains or cartography or design or all of the above? Yes, it is all of…

The World’s Best Beaches

Adding fuel to our spring fever, TripAdvisor just announced the winners of its inaugural 2011 Travelers’ Choice Beach Awards. Based on travelers’ TripAdvisor reviews, the best beach in the world is, drum roll please… Providenciales in the Turks and Caicos. The awards recognize the top beaches in the world and in the U.S. Myrtle Beach,…

Mega-Museum Opens in China

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The National Museum of China opened on March 17th in Beijing after a $380 million “facelift.” The nearly two-million-square-foot mega-museum containing over a million objects in 48 exhibition halls is purported to be the largest in the world. The revamped museum, located on Tiananmen Square, combines the former Museum of Chinese History and the Museum…

Travel Tips: Mumbai

Former Traveler research apprentice Stephanie Robichaux is in Mumbai, India, on a research fellowship, looking into how the Internet is used to arrange marriages. We caught up with her to see how her project is going, learn about her favorite spots and eats in India, get some India travel tips, and discover how working at…

Lights Out Saturday for Earth Hour

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Looking for something to do this weekend? How about turning out the lights this Saturday at 8:30 pm to mark Earth Hour? Earth Hour, organized by WWF, is a worldwide hour of darkness meant to get people thinking about how our actions as individuals can add up to make a positive difference in the health…

In our January-February edition of Traveler 20– a round-up of travel-worthy happenings taking place around the globe– we profiled the upcoming mummy exhibit “The Secrets of the Silk Road,” set to run from February 5th through June 5th at the University of Pennsylvania’s Museum of Anthropology and Archaeology. Yesterday, the Washington Post reported a sad…

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National Hispanic Heritage Month kicked off Wednesday with the commemoration of the independence of five Central American nations (Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, and Nicaragua). The celebrations continue with the marking of Mexico‘s Bicentennial this week and Chile‘s today. Special events, art exhibits, and lively fiestas are scheduled throughout the month around the country.…

Great Trips: Biking the TransAmerica Trail

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Writer and teacher Heidi Beierle is biking from her home in Eugene, Oregon, to Washington D.C. Along the way, she’s handing out decals that celebrate and promote the TransAmerica Trail, one of the Adventure Cycling Association‘s many North American bike routes that altogether span 40,633 miles in the U.S. and Canada. The decals serve to…

When I visited Hawaii’s Big Island last month, I was lucky enough to go on a helicopter ride. First, let me admit: I get motion sick on Amtrak’s Acela, claustrophobic in line for the bathroom at a rest stop along Interstate 95, and queasy when I lean too close to the edge at the top…

The second day of 2010 World Cup action heats up as Team USA takes on England today, Saturday, June 12th, at 8:30 p.m. local time at the Royal Bafoking Stadium in Rustenburg. In the U.S., ABC will begin its coverage of the game at 1:30 p.m. EST and kickoff’s at 2:30 p.m. EST. This is…

Congrats GeoBee Winners!

The finals of the annual GeoBee were held this morning at National Geographic Headquarters. At 10 a.m., we stationed ourselves in the cafeteria to watch live feed of the competition. The question set was impressive; the ten finalists impressed, too. After a first round of questions, Alex Trebek peppered the geo whizzes with questions about…

Gender and the GeoBee

Each spring I look forward to the National Geographic Geography Bee, which will be hosted here at our headquarters tomorrow. Because it’s a closed event (even for us), I can’t sneak in to catch a peek of the action live (though it is streamed on video throughout the building). But I get charged up by…