Despite its size, London is a very kid-friendly city. Almost 40 percent of the capital is dedicated to parks and public spaces, and major museums are free. The only problem is there’s so much to see. Here are some of the highlights.

Spending an art-filled day museum-hopping in New York City with my twin girls is even better than front-row seats at a Laurie Berkner concert—an equal thrill for the three of us with none of the jostling.

Can smartphone apps replace real-life tour guides? Sometimes.

Central Park is the ultimate Manhattan playground. Here’s where to go and what to do in this 843-acre family-friendly wonderland.

Fear-packing is what happens in that last 24 hours before your departure—when your mind starts to play tricks on you. In my case, the fears usually surround what the kids might need. I must pack, I tell myself, to account for every possible mishap. Here’s what’s wrong with that approach, and how to make a course correction.

This spring, I attended the Mom 2.0 Summit, a gathering of some of the most talented family bloggers and female entrepreneurs in the U.S. and Canada. While these women run the gamut when it comes to coverage–from politics to design–many of them are leaders in the travel blogging community. And who better to pump for tips about family travel than parents who embrace it as a lifestyle? Here are eight recs to remember the next time you’re planning a trip with the kids.

Finding the right hike for children can be tricky: The trail needs to be safe and not too strenuous, yet interesting enough to keep the young folks’ attention. As a bonus, it would be nice if the hike stimulated them to want to learn more about the place. America’s national parks abound in good kids’ hikes–both traditional and non-traditional. Here are six of the best and most diverse.

Opportunities for outdoor play abound in Jerusalem—you just have to know where to find them. Here’s a brief guide to six great activities for the young (and young at heart) in one of the oldest cities in the world.

“Mom, it looks like the White House!” my nine-year-old son Chase blurts from the backseat. The three of us–my daughter Mackenzie included–have just driven four hours from Washington, D.C. to White Sulphur Springs in West Virginia, our ears popping as we rolled up and down the bucolic Allegheny Mountains. Our destination: the legendary Greenbrier resort for a decadent weekend together.

Travelers keep two kinds of lists: the bucket list and the “wanted” list. Hong Kong should be on both, particularly when traveling with children.

Recently, I convinced my mother and my first-born son Ethan to hop a plane with me to Mexico’s Riviera Maya. For them it was a quick getaway to a sunny destination after a winter we all wanted to forget. But I had ulterior motives. More than anyone else, these two people (my own mother and the child who made me one for the first time) have shaped who I am. And while I’ve spent time with each of them on their own, this was a prime opportunity to celebrate the complex and precious relationship we share.

Tell your kids you’re visiting where the real Pocahontas was married, and motor through ten miles of woodlands along Colonial Parkway from Williamsburg to Jamestown, the first permanent English settlement in the Colonies, dating to 1607. After the buzz of Colonial Williamsburg, this quietly purposeful archaeological site on the James River seems Zen-like. Take a…

Perfect Paradise: Phuket

This December marks the tenth anniversary of the devastating tsunami that struck Southeast Asia. But Phuket, Thailand’s largest island, refuses to be defined by the tragedy. On a recent visit there, I discovered what makes this beach retreat so special and why, a decade after enduring one of the biggest natural disasters in world history, it’s stronger than ever.

I’ve heard the horror stories: Hours on end spent in a stuffy car desperately trying to get to some specific event (a wedding, a theme park) on time with a constant chorus of “Are we there yet?” emanating from the backseat. It doesn’t have to be that way. There are some key things you can do to make your next family road trip your best ever. Here are five to get you started.

I recently did something parents dream about; I took a vacation. With my kids. I travel with my children frequently, and I love it, but I categorize most of these as trips rather than rejuvenating getaways. This time, though, I flew to Mexico, checked into the Rosewood Mayakoba in Playa del Carmen, and didn’t leave until…

Endless Winter: Utah

A good rule of thumb for the best spring skiing is to “head high.” The altitude of the Rockies makes the western U.S. especially attractive this time of year. While Colorado might be more popular, Utah can be just the place to go, particularly if you want to do more than just ski!

Recreational vehicles sit somewhere between hotels and tents. The upside: RV life is autonomous—your quarters travel with you—and allows for spontaneous stops. But then again, RVs need loads of gas and can be tricky to park. In any case, they represent a truly unique mode of transport that’s tailor-made for road tripping. Here’s your guide to getting started.

Over the years I’ve done most everything 
with my sons—jumped in puddles, ridden roller coasters, skied black-diamond slopes. I’ve always thought of myself as a “fun” mom. However, they’re becoming young men, and it’s harder for me to do what they do. As they continue to grow, my husband, Robb, and I know we don’t have much time left to travel with our boys before they head out into the world. Time for a classic American road trip, RV style.

Venice Carnival With Kids

I wanted to introduce my two sons to the concept of Carnival. But was there a way to do it without subjecting them to the lewd drunkenness and nudity that often accompany such celebrations? And with so many world-class cities hosting bucket-list worthy festivities, where would we go? Venice.

Traveler Editor at Large Christopher Elliott is the magazine’s consumer advocate and ombudsman. Over the past 15 years he has helped countless readers fix their trips. Here’s his latest advice…

Reader Question: Can kids still travel on a parent’s lap for free?

For the past three years, we’ve driven north to Quebec, where the locals not only embrace the cold, they celebrate it. We’ve partied at the city’s Winter Carnival, gone dog sledding through winding forest trails, ice-climbed at Montmorency Falls, and even stayed at the famous Hôtel de Glace. This year’s adventure? Cross-country skiing.

Five Family Travel Resolutions

I don’t believe in New Year’s resolutions. But as winter continues its march (at least where I live in New York City), I’ve been dreaming up a few travel goals for 2014. Some are places, some are new services, all are experiences that will make this year of travel the best one yet.

My husband Ish and I thought we were adventurous people, but once our sons came into the picture, things felt a lot more risky. What if something happened to us out there? Or worse, what if some horrible parenting decision we made led to harm coming to one of our kids? Then we learned to let go–and it was the best thing for all of us.

Typical winter foods just aren’t my thing. I respect the fervor with which fans baste their roasts, whip their potatoes, and twirl their pasta. When the weather turns cold, I think about one thing: Tulum. This winter will be my fourth trip there, and each time I pull into this groovy Mexican beach town on the edge of the Riviera Maya, I find another restaurant that makes me swoon. Here are five musts.

Marco Polo observed early versions of dogsledding during his travels through Asia in the 13th century. Today, the activity endures as an ideal way to experience untouched winter landscapes. Start planning your first dogsledding–or skijoring–adventure with these quick tips from National Geographic Young Explorer Sarah McNair-Landry.