I don’t know about you, but for me, indulging in authentic, local cuisine while traveling—and finding the most authentic establishment to patronize—is a must. With warm-weather wanderlust upon us, we asked our Facebook fans to give us the inside scoop on their city’s signature dish, and where to go if you want to try it for yourself. Here’s what they had to say.

On warm evenings, Rome’s locals stroll the cobblestoned streets, cones and cups in hand. About 2,000 gelaterias exist in Rome. Most use additives, thickeners, and synthetic flavors–yes, even those that call themselves artigianale (artisanal). Here’s where to get the good stuff.

Like a fine wine, Australia’s Barossa Valley is aged perfection. An hour north of Adelaide, wineries here are housed in sandstone cottages built circa 1860, and multigenerational families still use Old World techniques and fruit from century-old vines planted in the shadow of ancient gum trees.

When someone mentions ramen, you probably think of those store-bought dried noodles you bring to life with boiling water and a packet of spices.

In Tokyo, ramen noodle soup is not fast food; it’s an art form.

U.S. Highway 101 stretches 300 miles between San Francisco and Santa Barbara, roughly tracing a footpath of 1760s Spanish explorers and connecting the 21 missions they founded. You’ll want to set aside at least three days to do this region justice–especially if you’re a oenophile. Here’s some insider intel to help you navigate this fertile zone.

Whether you’re a traditionalist or in search of a modern take on Montreal’s culinary landscape this winter, here are seven ways to get a taste for this vibrant French-Canadian city.

As dawn breaks in Paris, doughy smells permeate the air, and locals line up at neighborhood boulangeries for freshly baked croissants to enjoy alongside their morning coffee–and as an afternoon goûter, or snack. These yeast-leavened pastries from Vienna—known there as viennoiseries—reportedly arrived in France in the 18th century when Queen Marie Antoinette, originally from Austria, introduced them…

From strolling around Fitzgerald Park to ringing the famous bells of Shandon, Traveler associate editor Susan O’Keefe found a great variety of diversions in Cork city–and never once felt like a stranger. “Corkonians are friendly and engaging,” Susan says. “They’re proud of their Celtic heritage and enjoy telling stories. Just pull up a chair at a pub and listen.” Here, she shares her discoveries in the city and beyond.

Just past the gleaming high-rises of Hawaii’s capital, in traditional neighborhoods such as Chinatown and Kakaako, locals keep the heart of aloha beating in Honolulu’s art-filled galleries and island-themed bars. Here’s the best this tropical haven has to offer.

Louisville’s whiskey revolution is making a splash.

Typical winter foods just aren’t my thing. I respect the fervor with which fans baste their roasts, whip their potatoes, and twirl their pasta. When the weather turns cold, I think about one thing: Tulum. This winter will be my fourth trip there, and each time I pull into this groovy Mexican beach town on the edge of the Riviera Maya, I find another restaurant that makes me swoon. Here are five musts.

As part of the necklace of isles making up St. Vincent and the Grenadines, Bequia welcomes visitors at Port Elizabeth where they find a landscape worthy of a watercolor painting. Here are some of the highlights–including the best eats on the island, and where to find the perfect place for a picnic.

Looks can be deceiving. Take the case of dirty rice, the lumpy, scruffy one-pot dish eaten throughout Cajun country–and beyond–as a side or, occasionally, a main course.

Once the breadbasket of the Lesser Antilles—its arable land is a rarity in this corner of the Caribbean—St. Croix turned industrial in the 1960s and now relies almost entirely on imports. But last year’s closing of a large oil refinery here coincided with a back-to-the-land trend.

High on Wine in New Zealand

If Peter Jackson’s “The Lord of the Rings” trilogy were real it would still take place in New Zealand because no other place has so much natural enchantment. But the ring wraiths would be searching for grape clones instead of the gold ring, and Frodo would be uncorking a 2010 vintage Pinot Noir and not sweating the small stuff.

Moroccans like their sweets—even when they’re supposed to be savory.

The Beauty of Beaujolais

In France’s Beaujolais, you’ll find an intoxicating blend of warmth and welcome, but, as writer Bruce Schoenfeld warns, “Don’t expect hospitality directors or gift shops at the wineries you visit.” Here’s an insider’s take on how to get the most out of your time in this delightful region.

Ask a Canadian about his favorite dessert and “Nanaimo bar” (pronounced nuh-NYE-mo) is the likely reply. Named for the harbor town on Vancouver Island, the no-bake treat has sweetened the collective Canadian memory for decades.

Soon after arriving in the Azores in the 1430s and digging into the rich volcanic soil, Portuguese settlers planted Verdelho wine grapes. Six centuries on, travelers are increasingly exploring the vineyards of the Azores — especially those found on Pico Island, a UNESCO World Heritage site.

Honey tasting in the Caucasus is Darwinian tourism at its best. There are no signs, guides, routes, regulations, and only a handful of English speakers who know a whit about bees or honey. But it’s more than worth the trouble.

Socca is a cross between a crepe and a pancake, a thin disc made with chickpea flour, and it’s a specialty of Nice, the unofficial capital of France’s Cote d’Azur.

To those who think that the subject of Swiss cuisine can be summed up in one word — fondue — I say not so fast. In a country with four official languages (French, German, Italian, and Romansh) culinary traditions reflect a complex national identity. Here’s a taste.

My friend Carol, a born and bred Singaporean, told me that my guide had brought me to a “touristy,” “overpriced” imitation of a “real” hawker food center, Food Republic. Not that the food wasn’t delicious, but if I was to have the true hawker experience, I would have to leave air-conditioning behind and hit the streets, where it all began.

Holy Mole in Mexico

Mole poblano — a complex mixture of chocolate, chilies, nuts, and spices — is among the most revered dishes in Mexican cooking. Here’s where to get the best eats in the dish’s hometown, Puebla, Mexico.

Coffee Around the World

Here’s a drill-down on some of the different coffees that can be found around the world and the characteristics that give them their unique flavor.