Travel Lens: Sanjeev Kapoor’s World

Sanjeev Kapoor is constantly on the move, not only because he’s India’s most famous chef, but because he’s such a passionate ambassador for the country’s food. “I want Indian food to sit at the top of the world’s cuisines,” he says. Here’s a look at the world through Sanjeev Kapoor’s unique lens.

How to Eat the World in America

The empty stomach is the ultimate travel icebreaker. Everyone eats, everyone loves food, and the less you know about what’s on offer in a place, the more people want to help you. Whether you live in the United States or are simply visiting, you don’t have to leave the country to get a taste of the…

Savoring Italy’s Caffè Capital: Trieste

Elsewhere in Italy, locals down espresso on the go, but Trieste is a city for lingerers. The ornate, wood-paneled “grand cafés” here honor the legacy of Vienna, not Rome. Though the city has a complicated history—it belonged to Italy, Austria, Germany during World War II, Yugoslavia, and finally Italy again.

Drinking Chocolate in Bayonne

The last thing I expected to discover in Bayonne, the scrappy Basque town in southwestern France known for its salt-dried ham, was the most luscious hot chocolate to ever cross my lips, a velvety concoction coiffed with a dome of froth and sipped from a delicate, rose-bedecked porcelain cup in a turn-of-the-century chocolaterie beneath the ancient hulking arcades…

Travel Lens: Anthony Bourdain’s World

Television host, author, and former executive chef Anthony Bourdain has licked his plate clean all over the world, from soup dumplings in Shanghai to piranhas in Peru. Here’s a look at the world through his unique lens (and appetite).

Sriracha: Hot Sauce House Tour

After a fiery controversy over hot pepper fumes in 2013, the Huy Fong Sriracha factory, located 30 minutes outside of Los Angeles, cleaned up its act—as well as its air—and now fuels the condiment’s cult status with facility tours.

America’s Most Authentic Irish Pubs

Ireland’s pub culture is often imitated, but rarely duplicated. Here are four taprooms across the United States that come close to being spot-on, where you can enjoy a pint (or more) along with some neighborhood bluster and brogue.

Local Flavor: Charleston’s She-Crab Soup

She-crab soup might not look like much. But the history of this bisque-chowder hybrid is as rich as that of the city from which it hails.

Local Flavor: Bananas Foster in the Big Easy

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Bananas Foster was invented at Brennan’s of New Orleans in 1951. After the restaurant’s 2013 closure and expansive refurbishing, the flammable, rum-soaked dessert will once again light up the French Quarter.

Local Flavor: A Slice of Scandinavia

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The Danish word smørrebrød translates simply as buttered bread, but anyone familiar with the open-face sandwich devoured at lunchtime throughout Copenhagen will consider that pure Nordic understatement.

Tea Time in the Amazon

The next superfood is brewing deep in the Ecuadorian Amazon. Guayusa tea packs twice the antioxidants of green tea and as much caffeine as a cup of coffee. Local Kichwa people have long steeped the leaves to help them focus during hunts and help interpret dreams—and now, thanks to Brooklyn-based Runa, thirsty travelers can taste…

On Tap: Shedding Light on Irish Stout

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“There’s a lot more to the Irish stout than what’s offered in a pint of Guinness,” says “The World Atlas of Beer” co-author Stephen Beaumont. And where you are in Ireland determines what beer you drink.