The National Geographic Traveler Photo Contest has officially begun! The magazine will be awarding incredible prizes, so don’t miss your chance to win. Enter today > This year, we’re joining forces with Your Shot, Nat Geo’s award-winning photo-sharing community, to make the contest even more interactive. Check back to see if your photo is featured in one of our contest galleries,…

Taken from National Geographic’s archives, this unpublished 1943 photo of a crowded streetcar in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, makes all other commutes look like a joyride.

Simple, yet with a strong sense of place. That’s what stood out about this image of Tibet’s historic Tashilhunpo Monastery that was submitted to Your Shot, National Geographic’s online photo community.

Johan Lolos (on Instagram @LeBackpacker) has been roaming the globe with a pack on his back and a camera at the ready since 2013. He’s currently making his way across New Zealand, and sharing photographs from his escapades on Instagram. Here’s a peek into how he got this winning shot of a hiker in New Zealand’s Mount Cook National Park.

National Geographic explorers-in-residence Dereck and Beverly Joubert have spent the past three decades captivating audiences with their rare footage and photographs of Africa’s big cats. Now, they’re taking aim at a different kind of challenge: conservation tourism.

Photographing landscapes well is harder than one might think. National Geographic Your Shot community member Christoph Schaarschmidt solved this by waiting patiently to get this time-lapse shot of Trollstigen Mountain Road in Norway.

I was first sent to the Dordogne Valley in southwestern France more than two decades ago to shoot a story about a truffle farmer for a food magazine. Later, when I tasted my first black truffle, I thought my head was going to explode with the heady new flavor. And by dark that first day, I was as hooked on truffles as I was on the place of their origin.

Whenever a traveler returns to a beloved place after a long hiatus, the trip is inevitably attended by some combination of anticipation and dread. Will it be as great as you remember? Has time treated it well?

In addition to being longtime contributing photographers for Traveler magazine, my wife Sisse and I are frequently invited to join National Geographic Expeditions trips as photography experts. On a recent trip to the Macaronesia Islands, we had 25 passengers sign up for a photo workshop with us. We gave them assignments, or themes, to explore throughout our journey. Here’s one of the lessons learned along the way.

In addition to being longtime contributing photographers for Traveler magazine, my wife Sisse and I are frequently invited to join National Geographic Expeditions trips as photography experts. On a recent trip to the Macaronesia Islands, we had 25 passengers sign up for a photo workshop with us. We gave them assignments, or themes, to explore throughout our journey. Here’s one of the lessons learned along the way.

Catherine Karnow has been part of the Nat Geo family for the past 15 years, going on assignment for both National Geographic and Traveler, where she’s a contributing photographer. She also shares photography tips on the Nat Geo Travel site and leads photo seminars and workshops for the Society. Here’s a look at the world through her unique lens.

In addition to being longtime contributing photographers for Traveler magazine, my wife Sisse and I are frequently invited to join National Geographic Expeditions trips as photography experts. On a recent trip to the Macaronesia Islands, we had 25 passengers sign up for a photo workshop with us. We gave them assignments, or themes, to explore throughout our journey. Here’s one of the lessons learned along the way.

In addition to being longtime contributing photographers for Traveler magazine, my wife Sisse and I are frequently invited to join National Geographic Expeditions trips as photography experts. On a recent trip to the Macaronesia Islands, we had 25 passengers sign up for a photo workshop with us. We gave them assignments, or themes, to explore throughout our journey. Here’s one of the lessons learned along the way.

To many outsiders, the icons, costumes, and rituals associated with Mexico’s Day of the Dead festivities—held around All Saints and All Souls Days (November 1 and 2, respectively) in Oaxaca and other cities—seem macabre and ghoulish. Nothing could be further from the truth.

Over three decades, Traveler magazine has undergone dramatic changes to reflect where, how, and why we travel. In 1984, we sought out the sights; now we want unique experiences. We traveled to vacation; now we want to be transformed. In the past 30 years, we’ve shot more than 3.4 million photos and published some 36,000. Here we celebrate our anniversary through the camera lens, offering a chronicle of changing times.

Travel photography is, on the surface, a very simple endeavor. Go to a faraway place, stand in front of something you can’t see at home, and take a picture. What’s so hard about that? Well, that may well be the recipe for generations of boring family albums. Find out how to up your photography game when you’re exploring the world by joining @NatGeoTravel’s Dan Westergren for a live photo workshop at 1 p.m. ET on Thursday, October 2.

Amy Toensing, an American photojournalist committed to telling stories with sensitivity and depth, is known for her intimate essays about the lives of ordinary people. A regular contributor to National Geographic and National Geographic Traveler magazines, Toensing’s assignments have taken her all around the world, from the Jersey Shore to the remote jungles of Papua New Guinea. Here’s a look at the world through this award-winning photographer’s unique lens.

A National Geographic Traveler editor goes behind the lens with photo legend Steve McCurry.

Have you ever wondered what makes an award-winning photograph? Here’s your chance to find out. Join the judges of the 2014 Traveler Photo Contest for a Google+ Hangout On Air, and get the inside scoop on how they chose this year’s winners (they’ll be announced at the end of July!) from more than 18,000 submissions.

Photos can be a wonderful way of sharing meaningful experiences with others, but I worry that my attempts to document the moment make being present in it a challenge. Does photography support awareness of my immediate experience, or detract from it?

Joel Sartore is, among other things, a lifelong Nebraskan, an Eagle Scout, and a veteran photographer for National Geographic magazine. He’s also someone who cares deeply about the fate of our planet, and the species that depend on it, including us. Here’s a look at the world and all that’s in it through Joel Sartore’s unique lens.

This year’s National Geographic Traveler Photo Contest is winding down. So far, the entries have been surprising and stunning, but the winners are far from being chosen.

The June 30 deadline is fast approaching, but there’s still time to throw your hat in the ring. Here’s how to enter–and what you could win.

Dan Westergren is the director of photography for National Geographic Traveler. Though he had an early affinity for black and white photography, being responsible for a travel magazine’s photographic vision means Dan is, in his words, “surrounded by a rainbow riot of color digital images” on a daily basis. Beyond his exceptional eye for editing,…

If you approach America’s national parks like a nature photographer, not only will you get memorable images, but also you’ll experience the parks at their inspiring best. Here’s how.

Washington, D.C.’s famous cherry trees are nearing full bloom. Last spring, Nat Geo Travel took you there in real time with Dan Westergren, the head of photography for Traveler magazine, leading the way. Dan went down to one of the District’s most photogenic spots—the Tidal Basin—to capture this world-class capital city in all its springtime glory and offer…