The Fight to Save Africa’s Rhinos

The full-chested roars of male lions echo through the trees, pumping adrenaline into our veins as we watch from an open-air Jeep. We are close enough to the hulking predators to see the individual whiskers on their snouts and the piercing amber of their eyes. Our safari guide, Danielle Kueck, warns us not to make any…

The Plantation Every American Should Visit

The moment I see her name, I feel a lump in my throat. “Pauline Johnson” is written on the back of the small card hanging from a lanyard around my neck. It tells me she was a 12-year-old child who had watched her father die in Louisiana just before slavery was abolished in the United States. Everyone who visits…

Great Travel Literature: Cambodia

National Geographic’s travel literature expert, Don George, recommends four books that offer abiding insights into ancient and contemporary Cambodia.

Help Make 2016 the Year of the Postcard

A year ago, I asked our readers to join me in helping keep the iconic form of travel correspondence from going the way of the mastodon with a call to action: Send us a postcard from wherever you are, at home or abroad. The first female Maldivian seaplane pilot sent in a card, as did a tugboat captain in Florida. A tween wrote us. So did a nonagenarian. Some senders used the postcard’s pocket-size blank space to celebrate what postcards meant to them personally. Here are some of my favorite stories.

Dogsledding in Swedish Lapland

Above the Arctic Circle, Sweden’s Lapland region unfolds with snow-capped mountains, deep forest, and vast stretches of untamed wilderness. But forget about snowmobiles: The hands-on, eco-friendly, and far more rewarding way to tour is by dogsled.

David Lebovitz’s Favorite Edible French Souvenirs

Extra room in your new Longchamp bag? American chef and author David Lebovitz, who lives in Paris, recommends some of his favorite edible souvenirs to stock your larder or give as gifts.

Great Travel Literature: Japan

National Geographic’s travel literature expert, Don George, recommends four books that present lyrical passageways into Old Japan.

Florida’s Secret Manatee Retreat

Spot rare, gentle manatees at play on their annual winter vacation in Florida’s Blue Spring State Park.

Travel Lens: Don George’s World

From climbing Kilimanjaro and contemplating the magic of Uluru to exploring the jungles of Cambodia and the backcountry temples of Shikoku, legendary travel writer and editor Don George has seen the better part of our planet. Here’s a look at the world and all that’s in it through his unique lens.

Upon the Beach in Sunny Mozambique

A son embarks on a wistful voyage of discovery to far isles where his parents honeymooned.

Dian Fossey’s Living Legacy: The Mountain Gorillas of Rwanda

A 10-month-old mountain gorilla sits atop a thicket of undergrowth 20 feet from my face. He stays near his mother at first, warily eyeing our group of trekkers and trackers huddled together in whispered awe. Overtaken by curiosity, he crawls closer to our clicking cameras, pounding his tiny chest in an adorable display of bravado. Our guide, Francois…

Guardian of the Parks: Jonathan Jarvis on the NPS Centennial

Jonathan Jarvis can say one thing most of us can’t: He has his dream job. As head of the National Park Service (NPS), Jarvis oversees more than 84 million acres of public land in the United States—from its largest unit, Alaska’s Wrangell-St. Elias National Park, to its smallest, Thaddeus Kosciuszko National Memorial, in downtown Philadelphia. As the NPS celebrates its centennial in 2016, Director Jarvis shares his favorite park units, the ups and downs of the job, and his hopes for the next 100 years.