Living Legends: The Mardi Gras Indians of New Orleans

I’m sitting in a cluttered workshop in New Orleans’ Central City neighborhood. Surrounding me are plastic containers filled with beads and rhinestones of about every hue imaginable, elaborate feather headdresses, glue guns, oversize spools of thread, and fluffy lime-green tufts that suggest a Muppet has exploded. Along the back wall hang spectacular suits from Mardi Gras past, including a cobalt-blue beauty…

When Travel Goes Wrong

Sometimes bad things happen to good people when they’re far away from home. That doesn’t mean they have to ruin your trip. As Ken Budd reminds us, it’s all about putting things in the proper perspective.

Books That Will Make You Fall In Love With the World

National Geographic’s travel literature expert, Don George, shares four books guaranteed to make you fall in love with the world (and itch to start planning your next trip).

The Best Travel Books About Bali

Thinking about planning a trip to Bali or simply hoping to bone up on your knowledge about the Indonesian island province? Pick up one of these insightful books, recommended by our travel literature expert Don George.

Why Now is the Time to Visit Nepal

Late last year, I traveled to Nepal to report on whether the country was ready to welcome travelers after a magnitude 7.8 earthquake rattled it to its core in April 2015, followed by a second quake, considered an aftershock, in May. I came home wondering how you could not go. If ever there were a time to visit Nepal, it’s now.

Last, Loneliest, Loveliest: Auckland

A century ago, Englishman Rudyard Kipling commemorated Auckland in a poem. It was the first poem I learned at school, and, even to a child, the first line struck a plangent chord: Last, loneliest, loveliest, exquisite, apart. Auckland’s a grown-up city now, but its wilds are still dearest to my heart.

The Fight to Save Africa’s Rhinos

The full-chested roars of male lions echo through the trees, pumping adrenaline into our veins as we watch from an open-air Jeep. We are close enough to the hulking predators to see the individual whiskers on their snouts and the piercing amber of their eyes. Our safari guide, Danielle Kueck, warns us not to make any…

The Plantation Every American Should Visit

The moment I see her name, I feel a lump in my throat. “Pauline Johnson” is written on the back of the small card hanging from a lanyard around my neck. It tells me she was a 12-year-old child who had watched her father die in Louisiana just before slavery was abolished in the United States. Everyone who visits…

Great Travel Literature: Cambodia

National Geographic’s travel literature expert, Don George, recommends four books that offer abiding insights into ancient and contemporary Cambodia.

Help Make 2016 the Year of the Postcard

A year ago, I asked our readers to join me in helping keep the iconic form of travel correspondence from going the way of the mastodon with a call to action: Send us a postcard from wherever you are, at home or abroad. The first female Maldivian seaplane pilot sent in a card, as did a tugboat captain in Florida. A tween wrote us. So did a nonagenarian. Some senders used the postcard’s pocket-size blank space to celebrate what postcards meant to them personally. Here are some of my favorite stories.

Dogsledding in Swedish Lapland

Above the Arctic Circle, Sweden’s Lapland region unfolds with snow-capped mountains, deep forest, and vast stretches of untamed wilderness. But forget about snowmobiles: The hands-on, eco-friendly, and far more rewarding way to tour is by dogsled.

David Lebovitz’s Favorite Edible French Souvenirs

Extra room in your new Longchamp bag? American chef and author David Lebovitz, who lives in Paris, recommends some of his favorite edible souvenirs to stock your larder or give as gifts.