Conservation crusader, renowned primatologist, and Nat Geo Explorer-in-Residence Emeritus Dr. Jane Goodall talks about her hope for the future and the double-edged sword of tourism.

The Gombeys, the colorfully dressed masked dancers and drummers of Bermuda, represent a rich folklife tradition that reflects the tiny island’s wide-ranging roots—namely West African, British, Caribbean, and Native American.

Sanjeev Kapoor is constantly on the move, not only because he’s India’s most famous chef, but because he’s such a passionate ambassador for the country’s food. “I want Indian food to sit at the top of the world’s cuisines,” he says. Here’s a look at the world through Sanjeev Kapoor’s unique lens.

Artist Patrick Wesley was born and raised on Haida Gwaii, a 155-mile-long torch-shaped archipelago slung off British Columbia’s North Coast. A native Haida, Patrick began honing his carving skills while still a teenager, and has spent his life creating beautiful works from wood, silver, gold, ivory, and argillite. “The world should ‘heart’ my island because of its unique people, culture, and traditions,” Patrick says. Here’s a look at Haida Gwaii through his unique lens.

Like anything else you do in life, travel has its bad days. And while I tend to lean into the positive when it comes to taking stock of my experiences, seeking out lessons and silver linings, there are times when an awful moment leaves an indelibly bad taste in one’s mouth. Here’s why it’s wise to take a step back and see the forest—or the destination—for the trees.

You’ve probably seen this before. It’s what everyone pictures when they think of Machu Picchu—the verdant network of stone terraces, temples, and open-walled houses; the soaring peaks of Huayna Picchu framing the dramatic scene. When I arrived at Peru’s “lost” Inca citadel in the clouds, I was expecting to round the path beneath the guardhouse, walk through…

Whenever folks hear I’m from Savannah, they want to know if it’s still the same as it was in John Berendt’s best-selling “Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil.” They wonder, does the city still have the book’s romance—the mad artists, the oppressive beauty, the fever dreams of blood and passion?

I tell them, well, not if you just stay downtown.

Encompassing 1,441 square miles of Washington’s Olympic Peninsula, Olympic National Park invites visitors to explore three distinct ecosystems: subalpine forest and wildflower meadow; temperate forest; and the rugged Pacific shore. Because of the park’s relatively unspoiled condition and outstanding scenery, the United Nations has declared Olympic both an international biosphere reserve and a World Heritage site. Here’s a look at the wild wonderland from someone who knows and loves it best.

America’s National Park System is composed of more than 450 natural, historical, and cultural areas spread across the United States and its far-flung territories. Though Yellowstone deserves all the attention it gets, here are ten lesser-known park properties that are calling out for a visit.

Over a decade ago, the film “Under the Tuscan Sun” tossed Italy’s Maremma region into the global tourism spotlight. For today’s thoughtful travelers, this fertile region offers authenticity and nature on a grand scale best sampled in spring, when the days are warm, the nights are cool, and the land is bursting with life renewed.

Looking for some travel inspiration? Our travel writing guru Don George sounds off on the latest and greatest #TripLit titles that will transport you from Laos to post-Soviet Europe.

At the end of the 20th century and in the wake of the Rwandan Civil War, a country lay dying, and people the world over wondered how Rwanda would or could recover, let alone welcome tourists again. But Praveen Moman did the unthinkable: He founded a safari company and invited Westerners to come.

Has the age of flying green arrived? Not quite.

One usually gets to the Giant’s Causeway by way of Bushmills. It doesn’t hurt that there’s a distillery in the village that makes that great Irish whiskey. But you don’t need spirits to bring the Causeway to life. It does that fine, all by itself. As I would soon discover, this bit of primordial geology is loaded with spirits of another stripe.

I recently had the honor and pleasure of hosting an onstage conversation with author Cheryl Strayed at National Geographic headquarters in Washington, D.C. The ensuing evening resounded with rich and layered lessons, but here are three that have continued to reverberate within me ever since.

In the course of researching where I wanted to go in Colombia, the place I looked forward to visiting most was the Guajira Peninsula, a vast, arid desert that juts out into the Caribbean Sea like a fisted forearm.

I have been traveling to Belize every year for more than a decade and am already planning my next trip. Why? This small Central American nation delivers cultural and natural heritage in spades. Here’s a prescription for the perfect week in this small but mighty wonderland.

All signs point to the imminent death of this iconic form of correspondence. Postcard stamp sales are way down, fewer stores are selling them, and more and more travelers are turning to digital methods to share stories from the road. But who doesn’t smile when they receive a postcard in the mail, especially in this day and age? I’m resolving here and now to rekindle the childlike joy in sending and receiving postcards by paying it forward myself. Who’s with me?

National Geographic explorers-in-residence Dereck and Beverly Joubert have spent the past three decades captivating audiences with their rare footage and photographs of Africa’s big cats. Now, they’re taking aim at a different kind of challenge: conservation tourism.

We can thank President Theodore Roosevelt for establishing what became the nation’s first national wildlife refuge—Florida’s Pelican Island—in 1903. Today, more than 560 refuges throw a lifeline to some of America’s most vulnerable species, and to the millions of visitors who spend time there drinking in the great outdoors. Here are six national wildlife refuges that provide idyllic alternatives to urban life.

It’s the last night of my tenth trip to Hawaii. This time I’ve come to visit my daughter, Jenny, who is planning to move back to California this month after living on Oahu for more than two years. My wife, son, and I have gathered for one final family fling. And we’ve had a wonderful…

More travelers are going DIY, opting to—as the buzzy phrase goes—“travel like a local.” This usually means skipping expert advice and typical attractions, and following recommendations found on crowdsourced review sites.

The results of going this route are often great. But the trend begs some questions. Do travel experts have a future? Are they even necessary anymore? Can I say, yes?

Looking for some travel inspiration? Our travel writing guru Don George sounds off on the latest and greatest #TripLit titles that will transport you from Montana to Tibet.

For travelers looking to immerse themselves in a destination’s traditions and ways of life, homestays are a perfect entry point. They are the very definition of local travel, getting visitors on the ground as soon as possible and plunging them into the deep end of a new place.

Planning a roots travel trip can yield rewarding, and surprising, results. “For some people, the thrill of just being there is enough,” says Marion Hager, owner of genealogy travel company Hager’s Journeys. Here’s how she says you can get the most out of a trip.