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Wiener schnitzel—an unassuming breaded, fried veal cutlet—has so captured Vienna’s taste buds that it bears the city’s very name (Wien = Vienna). Yet Austria’s national dish may actually have originated in northern Italy as costoletta alla Milanese, a similarly prepared slice of veal.

In the 1970s, Ethiopian musician Mulatu Astatke made waves when he introduced a new style of music that layered jazz improvisation with Ethiopian folk rhythms and its traditional five-note scale. Now 70, the father of Ethio-jazz is still mixing things up.

In 1864, the French novelist Jules Verne published one of his most ambitious works—”Journey to the Center of the Earth.” Though Verne was widely regarded for the meticulous scientific research that informed his writing, what he posited in “Journey” has been rejected: namely, that volcanic tubes lead to the Earth’s core. This, of course, hasn’t stopped curious travelers from exploring the book’s geological protagonist: Iceland’s Snæfellsjökull.

Artist and graphic design activist Shepard Fairey gets his best inspiration from Hong Kong’s mix of Chinese and Western signage, iconography, and architecture. We asked him to point out other cities that go the extra mile to support their urban arts communities. Here are three.

In a nod to the Society’s yearlong focus on food, we asked our National Geographic Travel Facebook fans to share the best lip-smacking street eats they’ve sampled around the globe. Their answers left us hungry for more (and wanting to book a ticket to Southeast Asia). So grab a snack and join us on a tour of…

#NGTRadar: Travel Lately

Travel Lately—a roundup of the best new dispatches from the travel blogosphere—is a regular feature on Intelligent Travel every other Wednesday. You can play, too. Follow us on Twitter @NatGeoTravel and tag your favorite travel stories #NGTRadar to help us find the crème de la crème on the Web. Here are our latest picks.

Seattle local Adina Marguerite Pease is a creative type who lives to wander. While she’ll always be a California girl at heart, she moved to the Emerald City seeking greener pastures, and found them. When she’s not exploring the Pacific Northwest, Adina sets out on road trip adventures around the world with her husband and their Vizsla pup, Parsley. Here are a few of her favorite things about the city she calls home.

Traveler’s 30-year history coincides, roughly, with the rise of travel as a widespread phenomenon. As we celebrate the magazine’s anniversary, I asked a dozen movers and shakers in the Nat Geo Travel family to share the biggest changes they’ve seen in the past three decades—and their hopes for the future. Here’s what they had to say.

National Geographic Traveler columnist Heather Greenwood Davis is the magazine’s family travel advocate, guru, and soothsayer. Here’s her latest advice.

A hundred years have passed since the outbreak of World War I, a milestone vividly felt in the western Belgian town of Ypres, which endured some of the conflict’s fiercest fighting. On Armistice Day (November 11), thousands will crowd the streets, monuments, and cemeteries of this textile town turned shrine to the fallen.

The Icon: Golden Gate Bridge

Engineering wonder or colossal work of art? For many who drive or bike across, or simply admire it from afar, the Golden Gate Bridge is both. Here are some fast facts about this art deco icon.

When Cerro Negro—Nicaragua’s youngest volcano—last erupted in 1999, boulders tumbled down the western slope, creating a rocky, ascendable path. On the opposite side, the wind deposited dark, smooth ash that is perfect for sliding. In 2004, this unique pairing of terrains sparked an outlandish idea: volcano boarding.