Tag archives for Africa

Helen Davies may hail from the United Kingdom, but after an extended solo journey around Africa in her 20s, she fell in love with the continent. In fact, Zambia impressed her so much she ended up moving there to become an expedition leader and tour guide. Nowadays, she divides her time between Africa and the U.K. and documents her travels on her blog to help others uncover the best the world has to offer. Here are a few things about Livingstone, the city Helen calls her “second home.”

Last year, my new husband and I ventured to Zimbabwe for a once-in-a-lifetime safari experience to celebrate our milestone together. Neither of us had ever traveled anywhere in Africa before, so planning our adventure was both exciting and exhausting. Here are a few things we learned—both before and during our trip—that will save you some…

Rising star Danai Gurira believes in the power of hybrids—her term for people who thrive at a confluence of cultures. Born in Iowa, raised in her parents’ native Zimbabwe, trained in New York City, and now based in Los Angeles, “The Walking Dead” actress brings a layered perspective—and a rare spark—to her work.

Celebrated journalist Todd Pitock started his family and effectively his working life in Johannesburg. He left in 1993, but having returned yearly since then, he now realizes that Johannesburg got really good only after it wasn’t his city anymore. Here’s his take on the South African city’s new golden age in the wake of losing its most celebrated native son.

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“As a twenty-two-year-old teacher at a small school in rural Africa I had spent some of the happiest years of my life,” writes legendary travel writer Paul Theroux in his new book. Africa seeped into Theroux’s soul on that first visit, so much so that he has regularly returned to it as a kind of touchstone throughout his 50-year career.

Standing atop one of the tallest dunes on Earth, it felt as though the sand beneath our feet stretched into infinity. With its red dunes rolling endlessly into the sea, the Namib is the oldest desert in the world — a sea of silica stretching along Namibia’s entire Atlantic coast.

When the boat starts to rock, I’m not entirely reassured when the guide says, “Don’t worry. Just a hippo trying to come up under us.” Right. No big deal. We’re about to capsize in the middle of a herd of twenty hippos, spread across the river like fat, warm rocks, because one of them understands…

The Radar: Travel Lately

The Radar: The top travel news, stories, trends, and ideas from across the web. Got Radar? Follow us on Twitter @NatGeoTraveler and tag your favorite travel stories from the web #NGTRadar. Check back on the blog on Wednesdays for our Travel Lately roundup.

Food Fridays: Tastes of Morocco

Lisa T.E. Sonne has braved Arctic cold and remote jellyfish waters for Intelligent Travel. Now she faces her “inner chef” and finally learns to cook in savory Morocco.

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Although it’s not the first one, Kavango Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area could be the largest cross-border protected area in the world, spanning five countries in southern Africa.

The Radar: Travel Lately

The Radar: The top travel news, stories, trends, and ideas from across the web. Got Radar? Follow us on Twitter @NatGeoTraveler and tag your favorite travel stories from the Web #ngtradar. Check back on the blog on Wednesdays for our Travel Lately round up.

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The Radar: The top travel news, stories, trends, and ideas from across the web. Got Radar? Follow us on Twitter @NatGeoTraveler and tag your favorite travel stories from the Web #ngtradar. Check back on the blog for our roundups.

The Radar: The top travel news, stories, trends, and ideas from across the web. Got Radar? Follow us on Twitter @NatGeoTraveler and tag your favorite travel stories from the Web #ngtradar. Check back on the blog for our roundups. Photograph by RachelF2SEA, Flickr.

Travels with Moron: Part 2

The farther Moses and I went into the bush, the more vulnerable I became. No one in the world knew where I was, or whom I was with. I didn’t know. This was quickly developing into one of those “what were they thinking” moments you see on the news as the reporter tries to piece together the last known whereabouts of a missing tourist. Hedging my bet, I told Moses I’d pay him half of my “excursion fee” when we got back to Arusha. I figured it needed to be in someone’s best interest to keep me alive and well.

Travels with Moron: Part 1

By Ben Long — Flying to Tanzania to learn about Maasai cattle culture seemed like a great idea when I proposed it for a research fellowship. After all, I’d spent my whole life baling hay and chasing cows through the hills of West Virginia on my family farm. How different could cows be in an East African semi-nomadic culture? My epic flight allowed me time to come to a terrifying realization: I didn’t know a soul in Africa, and knew little about the Maasai other than that they are renowned herders. Suddenly, my upbringing on a farm didn’t seem so relevant.

The Radar: The top travel news, stories, trends, and ideas from across the web. Got Radar? Follow us on Twitter @NatGeoTraveler and tag your favorite travel stories from the Web #ngtradar. Check back on the blog for our roundups. Photograph by Thomas Achache, My Shot

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The Radar: Top travel news, stories, trends, and ideas from across the web. Got Radar? Follow us on Twitter @NatGeoTraveler and tag your favorite travel stories from the web #ngtradar. Check back the next day for our daily roundup.

Gap Adventures, a perennial outfitter favorite of the backpacker set, offers one of National Geographic Traveler’s 2011 Tours of a Lifetime: Ghana Untouched.  This 13-day tour through the English-speaking West African nation packs it all in: wildlife viewing, spectacular scenery, and plenty of local culture, in a loop through some of the least traveled parts…

Send Your Teen to Peru

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Or New Zealand, China, Greece, the Galápagos, India, Iceland, Costa Rica, or Tanzania, among other destinations. Not on their own, of course, but with National Geographic Student Expeditions. Each participant picks an assignment: (photography, marine biology, filmmaking, community service, creative writing, wildlife conservation are some of the choices), and are guided over the 10-day to…

Playing the Big Five Game in Zambia

If you’ve ever been on an African safari, you’ve probably heard of the “Big Five” game animals. Although I had heard of the term, I didn’t know that it was originally coined to refer to the most dangerous African game animals to hunt on foot. During my safari in Zambia I was happy to shoot…

Strange Planet: On Beyond Zebra

Ever wonder what it would feel like to go sightseeing in Washington, D.C. while dressed as a zebra? William Shubert, who works for National Geographic international editions, satisfied his curiosity by zipping himself into a full-body Morphsuit and heading out on the town. He filed a report, with more photos, on National Geographic’s Pop Omnivore…

I never dreamed that I would have spent so much time looking at the ground during my first outing into the African bush. Nor did I think I’d be examining so much dung. But there I was, bent over under a rising Zambian sun in the middle of South Luangwa National Park, taking photographs (which you can…

Out of Office: Into Africa

Associate Photo Editor Krista Rossow shares her first trip to Africa. A total safari newbie, I wasn’t sure what to expect when I packed my duffel bag to head to the bush in Zambia.  So, I tried to have few expectations. Everyone kept asking me what animals I wanted to see, as if it were…

Book Excerpt: Soul of a Lion

Welcome to the weekly installment of Library Fridays, where we excerpt from an upcoming title put out by our colleagues at National Geographic Books. Today’s title is Soul of a Lion: One Woman’s Quest to Rescue Africa’s Wildlife Refugees, by Barbara Bennett, which tells the story of Marieta van der Merwe, who runs the Harnas…

Adventure Travel with Heart

On the first and last days, it poured rain. At 9,000 feet, I came down with a bad case of bronchitis. At 12,000 feet, my face and my hands swelled disproportionately as a result of altitude sickness. At 15,000 feet, I worried about whether I would make it through at all. Seven days, six nights…