Annie Fitzsimmons – Intelligent Travel

Tag archives for Annie Fitzsimmons

A Moveable Feast: Exploring Quebec City

It’s hard not to eat yourself silly in Quebec City. Luckily, biking and walking are the best ways to explore this outdoor wonderland. Here are a few highlights of my moveable feast.

Quebec’s Grande Dame: Château Frontenac

Few hotels define an urban skyline like the Fairmont Le Château Frontenac. This grande dame, which lords over Quebec City from a cliff overlooking the Saint Lawrence River, is one of the most photographed hotels in the world, and it’s easy to see why. It’s hard to take a picture of the city without the formidable property creeping into the frame. Here’s a look at the icon’s past and present.

Why Locals Love Quebec City

From hiking in the Laurentian Mountains and biking along the St. Lawrence River to being front row, center, at their city’s huge summer festivals, here’s what locals love about Quebec City.

Île d’Orléans: Parish by Parish

With 7,500 residents scattered across six parishes on a rural wonderland twice the size of Manhattan, the Île d’Orléans is an absolute must-see, especially in the summer, when it’s bursting with treasures from small-scale farms, wineries, and culinary artisans. Here are my favorite discoveries, parish by parish, on the island oasis that is known as the “Garden of Quebec.”

Quebec City for Foodies

You wouldn’t have wanted to be my dining companion in Quebec City. I was completely inappropriate, struggling to stop chocolate from dribbling out of a crepe or digging out the soft parts of olive bread to pair with local cheeses, leaving the hapless crust. I don’t regret any of it—not even an unfortunate oil-dripping, finger-licking incident involving a crazy delicious croustillant at the Marché du Vieux-Port. The food is that good.

What Locals Love About Cape Town

From the always-changing city center to sleepy vineyard-filled valleys, here’s the scoop on what locals love about Cape Town.

Lisbon Like a Local

I recently spent nine days in Lisbon, which felt downright decadent. The whole time I was there, I kept meaning to visit Castelo de São Jorge. It’s a guidebook must-see and I definitely had time. But the castle on the hill started to feel less and less important as I roamed the city’s colorful neighborhoods and joined the rhythm of everyday life. Here’s why I returned home an ambassador for the Portuguese capital.

What They Don’t Tell You About the Galápagos

I spend a lot of time exploring big, dynamic cities. But these isolated islands 600 miles off the coast of Ecuador grew on me in such a way that when I left, I felt as though I was taking some of the characteristics of the landscape and animals—fearlessness, energy, equilibrium—home with me. Here are a few other things I learned about the Galápagos along the way.

Why I Love London in the Winter

London isn’t high on many people’s travel lists past early fall, but I happen to love London when it’s cold outside. “You get to see the city for what it really is in the winter,” my friend Lauren Bryan Knight told me. “It’s London with her hair down, devoid of anything other than the quiet rhythm of Londoners living out their daily routines.” Here’s why the English capital should be on your winter travel list—and how to make the most of your time while you’re there.

Six Reasons to Visit Paris Right Now

Last week, I enjoyed two completely different dinners out in the French capital’s 11th arrondissement. The contrasting experiences in the so-called “Brooklyn of Paris” reminded me why right now is a wonderful time to be in the city that casts a magical spell, whether it’s your first or fifteenth visit.

Just Back: Ireland’s Dingle Peninsula

Nat Geo Travel’s Annie Fitzsimmons spends a large part of her life scouting out the sites, restaurants, and people that reveal the distinctive soul of cities large and small. But even Urban Insiders need a break from the hustle and bustle once in a while. So after attending the Adventure Travel World Summit in Killarney, she couldn’t resist…

The Changing Face of Travel

Traveler’s 30-year history coincides, roughly, with the rise of travel as a widespread phenomenon. As we celebrate the magazine’s anniversary, I asked a dozen movers and shakers in the Nat Geo Travel family to share the biggest changes they’ve seen in the past three decades—and their hopes for the future. Here’s what they had to say.