Tag archives for antarctica

Joel Sartore is, among other things, a lifelong Nebraskan, an Eagle Scout, and a veteran photographer for National Geographic magazine. He’s also someone who cares deeply about the fate of our planet, and the species that depend on it, including us. Here’s a look at the world and all that’s in it through Joel Sartore’s unique lens.

The staff at National Geographic Travel is always criss-crossing the globe to uncover the best and the brightest places, but we have travel wish lists just like everyone else. Here’s where we want to go in 2014 and why.

Packing List: Antarctica

It took Ernest Shackleton years to prepare for his expedition to Antarctica. Modern-day travelers will need to plan in advance as well. Here are a few practical tips to get you started, including what to bring.

The Radar: Travel Lately

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The Radar: The top travel news, stories, trends, and ideas from across the web. Got Radar? Follow us on Twitter @NatGeoTravel and tag your favorite travel stories with #NGTRadar. Check back on the blog each Wednesday for our Travel Lately roundup.

The Radar: Travel Lately

The Radar: The top travel news, stories, trends, and ideas from across the web. Got Radar? Follow us on Twitter @NatGeoTraveler and tag your favorite travel stories from the web #NGTRadar. Check back on the blog on Wednesdays for our Travel Lately roundup.

The Radar: The top travel news, stories, trends, and ideas from across the web. Got Radar? Follow us on Twitter @NatGeoTraveler and tag your favorite travel stories from the Web #ngtradar. Check back on the blog for our roundups. Photograph by RobVSF, Flickr.

The Radar: The top travel news, stories, trends, and ideas from across the web. Got Radar? Follow us on Twitter @NatGeoTraveler and tag your favorite travel stories from the Web #ngtradar. Check back on the blog for our roundups.

Ever wonder what it’s like in the coldest place on Earth? You’re about to find out. Zip up your parka and get ready to take a free virtual journey to Antarctica with us this Wednesday, April 11 at 8:00 p.m. ET. Register today! National Geographic Expedition’s expert Ice Team will show you the best this mysterious, untrammeled continent has…

Photos: Where You Went

Our readers boast impressive travel résumés, which is why every Friday we ask you the same question on Facebook: Where are you traveling this weekend? See photos of where YOU went, and get inspired to plan your next trip. Photos by readers like you. Upload your favorite travel photos with a caption to Your Shot/Travel at ngm.com/yourshot. Tag all…

Traveler intern Daniel Bortz thought diving into the Chesapeake Bay in the dead of winter took guts, until he heard of Antarctica’s exclusive club. In Baltimore, the Chesapeake Bay area marks a popular summer destination for tourists, sailors, and swimmers alike. Except one day of the year, hundreds line up along the shore to take…

Andrew Evans gets a taste of Falklands hospitality on Carcass Island.   Carcass Island is perhaps the least appetizing name for destination dining, but that’s exactly where I went to eat. As the name implies, I did see a few carcasses on the island, mostly little lumps of penguin bones–the sad endings of a few…

One cannot travel to Antarctica without immediately thinking about those who came before. And one name in particular always stands out: Sir Ernest Shackleton, whose adventures through the ice are some of the more iconic expeditions of all time. Andrew Evans reflects on retracing Shackleton’s footsteps, and the nature of exploration now. Maybe I’ve mentioned…

We have a sneaking suspicion that Andrew Evans traveled the entire 10,000 miles by bus just to hang out with penguins. You don’t have to remind me: I know how lucky I am. I am lucky to travel so much and I am luckiest of all for getting to see so many penguins. I have…

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Andrew Evans is back from Antarctica, but he’s still blogging for us here at Intelligent Travel. Today he details the bleak, inhospitable conditions he found in the British Overseas Territory of South Georgia. If you haven’t figured it out yet–I like really remote places. Barren, bleak, far flung–the less accessible, the better. You’d think Antarctica…

The Bus2Antarctica journey continues, as Andrew Evans unpacks his bags and downloads the infinite videos he took while traveling on board the National Geographic Explorer. Today’s topic of interest: Seals. I used to be one of those kids at the zoo with my face pressed against the glass, gazing underwater at the seals twisting and…

UPDATE: Andrew Evans gives us his report from the field after the jump. SECOND UPDATE: There’s been more black penguin sightings by our readers. THIRD UPDATE: Watch a video of the penguin. When Andrew Evans sent us this photo of a rare melanistic penguin that he spotted during his travels, I became intrigued. So I…

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Andrew Evans takes us along for a cruise on board the National Geographic Explorer. This is not a pleasure cruise–Lindblad Expeditions is quite clear that the experience they offer is one of real exploration and expedition. On so many days I’m up and out on the front deck before six in the morning in order…

Andrew Evans, we love you, but today you’re killing us with jealousy. Be very jealous. I got to hold a penguin in my lap. I really didn’t plan on it. There are rules about these things. The International Association of Antarctic Tour Operators (IAATO) guidelines and the Antarctic Treaty forbid the touching of any wildlife–in…

Andrew Evans takes a moment to follow in other explorers’ footsteps and name a piece of Antarctica. By the time humans entered the modern age, we had already assigned names to most everything on our planet. Then came Antarctica–a whole continent filled with mountains, glaciers and penguins all waiting to be named. The naming of…

Andrew Evans explores the Antarctic Peninsula. I think weather is the only thing that really matters in Antarctica–weather and luck. And I think most every Antarctic explorer would agree with me. Scott had a turn of bad weather–he and his team perished. Shackleton had a good wind that carried him all the way to South…

Andrew Evans reflects on his six weeks of haphazard bus-filled travels, and the wonder of actually setting foot on Antarctica.   You’ve all been very patient readers. Thank you. I’ve been waiting a long time, too. It’s taken me six weeks to get to Antarctica and I’ve found out that the closer I get, the…

For Andrew Evans, passing over the Antarctic Circle was akin to crossing a sacred finish line. I’ve crossed a lot of lines on this journey–state lines, borderlines, the equator, both tropics (Cancer and Capricorn), along with the many ticket lines that stood between me and my ultimate southern goal. Out of all these lines the…

Andrew Evans offers us a glimpse inside his cabin on board the National Geographic Explorer. Anyone else feel like stowing away? Andrew Evans is tweeting about his travels aboard the National Geographic Explorer at @Bus2Antarctica. Want more? Follow the map of his journey, bookmark all of his blog posts, watch videos, and get the full…

Bus2Antarctica: My First Iceberg

Andrew Evans encounters his first iceberg on his way to Antarctica (while wearing a penguin shirt, naturally). Just like the very first Antarctic explorers (Ross, Wilkes, and Captain Cook), my first sign that I was getting warmer (i.e. getting closer) showed up in the form of this giant ice cube that bobbed in the sea…

National Geographic Traveler contributing editor Andrew Evans traveled for over 45 days, taking buses from Washington D.C. through the Americas with one mission in mind: Getting on board the boat that would take him to Antarctica. Here, he describes the bliss of actually climbing onto the deck of the MV National Geographic Explorer. The world’s…