Tag archives for Costas Christ

I consider travel an enlightening experience, but it never occurred to me that beams of light might change the way we travel. Recently, lighting scientists (yes, they exist) have dissected the specific wavelengths of electric light to better understand how they affect our bodies. “Hotels will offer guest rooms with lights that help us to…

A confession: I don’t play golf, partly because I’m unable to reconcile my conservation work with a sport also known for habitat destruction, massive water consumption, and heavy use of chemicals. Now the sport may be about to take a big step, in a surprising place.

In a world that’s constantly evolving, it’s important to ask big questions about the future of travel and how we’re changing our planet by exploring it en masse. That’s why we asked 13 luminaries in their spheres–from David Byrne and Richard Branson to Pico Iyer and Digital Nomad Andrew Evans–to tackle 13 subjects we think are worth talking about as we count down to 2014.

If you’re like me, you drink water from a glass or a reusable container when you’re home or about town. When you travel, it’s a different story. Throwaway plastic bottles remain the most convenient way for hotels to distribute water, generating trash that often ends up in our oceans. But the tide is turning, thanks to the Whole World Water campaign.

The superrich have long been known — accurately or not — for their competitiveness. But that doesn’t have to be such a bad thing. Learn more about four billionaires who are investing in the future of our oceans.

There are more than 7,000 islands in the Philippines, so it comes as no surprise that after tourism’s heavy trek across Southeast Asia’s once pristine outposts, the less explored parts of the archipelago are poised to be the latest “paradise found.” Indeed, that is already under way, which is why the tale of two islands — Palawan and Boracay — offers lessons as the country lays out the welcome mat to more visitors.

When I became editor of National Geographic Traveler magazine 15 years ago, the word “ecolodge” suggested places that were so pared down and dutiful that many travelers were regarding them as the domain of the backpacker — all basic furnishings and uninspired food. Therefore it is astonishing to see how much the lodging industry has changed in little more than a decade.

Since 2007, the illegal ivory trade has more than doubled. If the massacres do not stop, our children could be the last generation to see an African elephant in the wild. As travelers, we can — and must — do something about it. Here are the crucial actions to take.

Today, cities are sprouting some of the most innovative green projects in the world, redefining a sustainable future for urban dwellers — and attracting travelers, too.

Here are just a few examples.

Each spring, Traveler Editor at Large Costas Chris tucks his passport away and turns into a blueberry farmer, tending the crop on a 40-acre organic farm in Maine. Call it his double life.

National Geographic Traveler’s February/March issue is on newsstands now. Find out what’s inside…

Although it’s not the first one, Kavango Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area could be the largest cross-border protected area in the world, spanning five countries in southern Africa.

Get a sneak peek inside National Geographic Traveler’s epic, year-end issue.

Find out what’s inside Traveler’s newest issue…

Need a vacation? Traveler’s latest cover story takes you on a tour of our favorite lake escapes in North America – the perfect way to unplug and unwind this summer. Find out what else this issue has in store.

Nobody knows this world better than National Geographic Traveler, and this month’s issue proves it with 50 Tours of  Lifetime. Our expert editors will lead you all over the globe — from Botswana to Bulgaria to bicycling the “Blue and Gray.” There’s something for everyone, guaranteed. Also in this issue: Just in time for National Park Week,…

Curious about Cuba? This issue’s cover story, written by James Vlahos, will satisfy your craving by taking you deep inside this Caribbean hot spot and the salsa music (and dancing!) that has helped define its unique flavor over the years. Also in this issue: Far from flagging, Andrew Nelson shows how Detroit is motorin’ into…

Almost exactly one year ago, I sat with President Nasheed of the Maldives in the shade of coconut palms on the blue lagoon island of Soneva Fushi, where the sustainable tourism resort group Six Senses was founded in 1995. I listened intently as he explained his vision of the Maldives becoming the world’s first fossil…