Tag archives for Don George

Those of us who follow the way of wanderlust are wild romantics. When we encounter the pheromone of the unfamiliar, we feel, see, touch, taste, and smell more keenly. Our minds are on high alert, noticing and processing everything–from the geometry of cobbled paths and thatched roofs to the tones of stray dogs and wild birds to the smell of new flowers and old dust. We fall in love with the world.

Last fall I attended the Ubud Writers & Readers Festival on the Indonesian island of Bali. I had fallen in love with the artful atmosphere and fervent grace of Ubud at the same festival the year before, so I had arrived in the city full of expectations. Yet on my first day there, as I walked down the main street, I found my senses pummeled by a noxious non-stop stream of cars and motorbikes, exhaust fumes, chaos, and noise. Had that other Ubud been just a dream?

Crafting a travel story that truly succeeds rests on four pillars of engagement: with your subject, with yourself, with your audience, and with your writing. How do I go about trying to achieve this? I think the best way to explicate that is to trace my own journey when I work on a story: before, during, and after the trip. Here’s Part III: Re-Creating the Stepping Stones of Your Journey.

Crafting a travel story that truly succeeds rests on four pillars of engagement: with your subject, with yourself, with your audience, and with your writing. How do I go about trying to achieve this? I think the best way to explicate that is to trace my own journey when I work on a story: before, during, and after the trip. Here’s Part II: Finding and Focusing Your Story on the Road.

Crafting a travel story that truly succeeds rests on four pillars of engagement: with your subject, with yourself, with your audience, and with your writing. How do I go about trying to achieve this? I think the best way to explicate that is to trace my own journey when I work on a story: before, during, and after the trip. Here’s Part I: Plotting Your Story Before You Go.

I sat down with Don George, editor at large at National Geographic Traveler and author of Lonely Planet Guide to Travel Writing, and asked him why and how travel writing gets under our skin, who inspired him to become a travel writer in the first place, and what he thinks about the explosion of travel blogging and the future of the craft itself. Here’s what he had to say.

Forgo the generic gift card this holiday season and wrap up a new travel-inspiring book instead with these five #TripLit recommendations from Don George.

I sat down with Don George, editor at large at “National Geographic Traveler” magazine and author of “Lonely Planet Guide to Travel Writing,” and asked him to don (no pun intended) his editor’s cap and dispense some pearls of wisdom about what budding travel writers can do to make their work sing. This is what he had to say.

Last month Don George had the opportunity to participate for the second year in a row in the Ubud Writers & Readers Festival on the Indonesian island of Bali. Here’s his account of the experience.

In many cultures, doors to the underworld creak open in October, so it’d be criminal not to sink your teeth right now into these transporting thrillers.

I asked veteran travel writer and editor Don George about his plan of attack when he’s out on assignment in the field. Here’s what he had to say.

I asked veteran travel writer and editor Don George if he had any advice about how emerging storytellers can make their mark on the travel writing scene. Here’s what he had to say.

While I’ve met a few modern-day nomads in my travels, most of us can’t be on the road all the time. So how can we keep our wanderlust satiated in those stretches between journeys? We can escape into a really good book that brings a far-off place to us. Here are three extraordinary travel narratives that deserve to be counted among the classics.

My #TripLit pick for August: Headhunters on My Doorstep, by J. Maarten Troost. Read on to find out why.

Socca is a cross between a crepe and a pancake, a thin disc made with chickpea flour, and it’s a specialty of Nice, the unofficial capital of France’s Cote d’Azur.

My #TripLit pick for July? “The Longest Road: Overland in Search of America, from Key West to the Arctic Ocean,” by Pulitzer Prize winner Philip Caputo. Here’s why.

My #TripLit Pick for June? “The World Is a Carpet: Four Seasons in an Afghan Village” by award-winning journalist Anna Badkhen. Here’s why…

“As a twenty-two-year-old teacher at a small school in rural Africa I had spent some of the happiest years of my life,” writes legendary travel writer Paul Theroux in his new book. Africa seeped into Theroux’s soul on that first visit, so much so that he has regularly returned to it as a kind of touchstone throughout his 50-year career.

While Greece may be in the headlines these days for its economic woes and social unrest, when I think of Greece, I picture crystalline sunlight on a landscape of rock, sea, sand, and tree; bone-white ruins of layered history; and bright-eyed, big-living people. That’s the Greece Christopher Bakken brings to life in his delightful new book.

In recent years the pilgrimage route to Santiago de Compostela, Spain, has gained a certain cachet. Books have been written on it; movies have been made about it. Almost invariably, the focus of these accounts has been the Spanish portion of the pilgrimage, culminating with arrival at the cathedral in Santiago itself. David Downie offers a different take on an ancient legend.

Legendary writer and editor Don George introduces readers to the latest and greatest travel literature out there in the world. Do you have any recommendations for great travel reads? Share them with @NatGeoTraveler on Twitter by using the #TripLit hashtag.

Trip Lit columnist Don George had the good fortune of participating in the Ubud Writers & Readers Festival, a gloriously cornucopic and chaotic literary love fest that brought hundreds of writers and word enthusiasts from around the world to Bali in early October. Here’s a report straight from the horse’s mouth.

Find out what’s inside Traveler’s newest issue…

#TripLit: Andrew McCarthy Interview

Look for #TripLit posts on Thursdays on the blog, and join the conversation by following the #TripLit team on Twitter (@Don_George, @amytravels, @RRegister) and sharing your own literary finds and thoughts with us and each other by using the #TripLit hash tag.

#TripLit: Interview with Don George

Each month, Traveler’s Trip Lit column introduces readers to recently published books that can add another dimension to their travel experiences. I caught up with our reviewer, legendary travel writer and editor Don George, to find out how he defines Trip Lit, why he became a travel writer, and what travel writing has inspired him along the way. This is what he had to say.