Tag archives for family travel

Despite its size, London is a very kid-friendly city. Almost 40 percent of the capital is dedicated to parks and public spaces, and major museums are free. The only problem is there’s so much to see. Here are some of the highlights.

Spending an art-filled day museum-hopping in New York City with my twin girls is even better than front-row seats at a Laurie Berkner concert—an equal thrill for the three of us with none of the jostling.

Can smartphone apps replace real-life tour guides? Sometimes.

Fear-packing is what happens in that last 24 hours before your departure—when your mind starts to play tricks on you. In my case, the fears usually surround what the kids might need. I must pack, I tell myself, to account for every possible mishap. Here’s what’s wrong with that approach, and how to make a course correction.

This spring, I attended the Mom 2.0 Summit, a gathering of some of the most talented family bloggers and female entrepreneurs in the U.S. and Canada. While these women run the gamut when it comes to coverage–from politics to design–many of them are leaders in the travel blogging community. And who better to pump for tips about family travel than parents who embrace it as a lifestyle? Here are eight recs to remember the next time you’re planning a trip with the kids.

Opportunities for outdoor play abound in Jerusalem—you just have to know where to find them. Here’s a brief guide to six great activities for the young (and young at heart) in one of the oldest cities in the world.

“Mom, it looks like the White House!” my nine-year-old son Chase blurts from the backseat. The three of us–my daughter Mackenzie included–have just driven four hours from Washington, D.C. to White Sulphur Springs in West Virginia, our ears popping as we rolled up and down the bucolic Allegheny Mountains. Our destination: the legendary Greenbrier resort for a decadent weekend together.

Travelers keep two kinds of lists: the bucket list and the “wanted” list. Hong Kong should be on both, particularly when traveling with children.

Recently, I convinced my mother and my first-born son Ethan to hop a plane with me to Mexico’s Riviera Maya. For them it was a quick getaway to a sunny destination after a winter we all wanted to forget. But I had ulterior motives. More than anyone else, these two people (my own mother and the child who made me one for the first time) have shaped who I am. And while I’ve spent time with each of them on their own, this was a prime opportunity to celebrate the complex and precious relationship we share.

I’ve heard the horror stories: Hours on end spent in a stuffy car desperately trying to get to some specific event (a wedding, a theme park) on time with a constant chorus of “Are we there yet?” emanating from the backseat. It doesn’t have to be that way. There are some key things you can do to make your next family road trip your best ever. Here are five to get you started.

I recently did something parents dream about; I took a vacation. With my kids. I travel with my children frequently, and I love it, but I categorize most of these as trips rather than rejuvenating getaways. This time, though, I flew to Mexico, checked into the Rosewood Mayakoba in Playa del Carmen, and didn’t leave until…

South Carolina’s Charleston offers a kid-pleasing combination of history and fun. Here’s a look at four ways to enjoy some quality family time in this charming Southern city.

Years ago, my husband and I drove the Pacific Coast Highway and quickly realized that we were passing through some of the most exotic and romantic landscapes in the world. Since then we’ve had a couple of kids, and we recently took them for their own California experience. This time we explored the valleys instead of the seaside — but we fell in love just the same. Here’s a download on the best of Silicon Valley.

Glamping With the Family

If you’re intrigued by the idea of reconnecting with nature with your family, but cringe at the thought of sleeping on the ground with nothing but a thin tent between you and the ground, let me introduce you to one of the hottest new travel trends: glamping!

My kids and I will be retracing the most famous expedition in American history on the Lewis and Clark Trail. It took the intrepid explorers more than a year and a half to cover this distance. We’ll do it in two months. On bikes.

Any child who has taken basic world history classes knows about Athens and its indelible contribution to Western civilization. But studying a place and its heritage is far different from actually being there.

Mothers don’t always make the easiest traveling companions. Check out these tips for how to survive one-on-one travel.

Family-Friendly Europe

Say what you will about Europe in the summer. Sure, there are longer lines, sweatier tourists, and pricier flights, but there’s also gelato on sunny piazzas, warm evening walks through historic sites, and, most important, no school. Here are four of the family-friendliest destinations in Europe, and tips for enjoying them with your kids.

Of all the countries we’ve visited as a family, the hardest, by far, was China. As a family that believes there are things to be learned from everything in life, we try to turn even the most frustrating experiences into teachable moments. Here are the lessons we took away from this one.

African safaris are the things of bucket-list dreams. Who in their right mind would pass up the opportunity to watch animals in their natural habitat, roaming free as they were meant to? Who wouldn’t get excited about this chance of a lifetime?

My kids.

My daughter Mackenzie just turned 7. At her birthday party at the Playseum, she stood in front of a child’s version of a world map—no country names, just illustrations of objects like whales and palm trees and pandas. I watched, astonished, as she pointed out dozens of places—Paris, Antarctica, China, Australia. Then it dawned on…

It sounds like such a romantic notion: Leaving everything behind but the family you’ve created together and heading out to see the world. But the trip I took with my husband, Ish, and our two sons was more complicated than that, and, at the same time, simpler than we ever imagined.

Here they are — ten kid-friendly things you can do in and around the Louvre in Paris.

Family. Travel.

Those two words are enough to make the average reader click away. But they shouldn’t be.

If you close your eyes and imagine Kauai, you might see jagged peaks plunging into hidden rainforest valleys, beaches with impossibly blue waves thundering ashore, and of course, endless summer weather.

But that’s not all there is to it. Behind that postcard facade there’s a funky island that your kids can connect with. Ours did.