Tag archives for France

Paris: Tossed But Not Sunk

The Age of Enlightenment. The City of Light. A place whose motto has been Fluctuat nec mergitur—Tossed but not sunk—since the Middle Ages.

Whatever the future holds, perhaps now is the time to go to Paris, if you’ve ever thought of going.

I Heart My City: Anne’s Chambéry, France

Few outside of France have heard of Chambéry, and those who have probably know it as a pit stop en route to their favorite Alpine ski stations. Washington, D.C. native Anne Donnelly (on Instagram @amdonn8) has the pleasure of living in this little medieval city in the mountains while she works as an English language teaching assistant in the…

How to Explore Paris Like a Flâneur

Stroll France’s capital and you’ll see human nature on full display, from doyennes taking their café to lovers cooing by the River Seine. As poet Charles Baudelaire put it, in Paris “the spectator is a prince who everywhere rejoices in his incognito.”

Europe’s Rising Star: Bordeaux

Visitors once just glanced over this UNESCO-listed city’s stately 18th-century squares and harmonious architecture before heading out of town. Now there are plenty of reasons to linger in Bordeaux.

Just Back: Burgundy

Senior Travel Books Editor Barbara A. Noe visited the Burgundy region of France as part of research for the upcoming National Geographic book “Romantic Journeys of a Lifetime.” Here are some of the high points of her trip, in her own words.

The Riches and Revelations of Paris

Forty summers ago, Paris changed my life. This year, to celebrate the 40th anniversary of that life-changing stay, I managed to carve out three days to spend in the City of Light. I arrived with no specific agenda or itinerary, but in the back of my mind I was hoping to reunite with that long-ago me.

How to Tackle Telluride’s Via Ferrata

Gaze up at the soaring cliffs above Telluride and you might imagine that only rock climbers with nerves of steel could scale the foreboding walls. Yet a via ferrata, or “iron road,” traverses a sheer face above town, offering an adrenaline-infused adventure for anyone willing to clip onto a steel cable and negotiate a rock wall using metal ladder rungs. Think of it as hiking on steroids.

Travels on the Run: Marseille

For National Geographic Books Senior Editor Barbara A. Noe, going on a run is the best way to get oriented in a new city, and a great way to take in the sights. So lace up your sneaks and read on to get Barbara’s tips on where to run in some of the world’s greatest places—and what to see along the way.

I Heart My Island: Île d’Aix

Pierre Antoine Berniard has lived in Germany, Scotland, the United States, Canada, and Jamaica, but his heart belongs to Île d’Aix. “Even when I was abroad, Île d’Aix was my strong roots,” he says. “A sailor would say [that the island is] my point fixe.” And for good reason: Berniard’s familial ties there date back to the early 1700s, when his winemaking forebears came to the island.

Travel Inspiration: Great New Reads

Looking for some travel inspiration? Here are three new #TripLit reads that will transport you to a faraway place.

Drinking Chocolate in Bayonne

The last thing I expected to discover in Bayonne, the scrappy Basque town in southwestern France known for its salt-dried ham, was the most luscious hot chocolate to ever cross my lips, a velvety concoction coiffed with a dome of froth and sipped from a delicate, rose-bedecked porcelain cup in a turn-of-the-century chocolaterie beneath the ancient hulking arcades…

#NGTRadar: Travel Lately

The Radar—the latest and best from the travel blogosphere—is a regular feature on Intelligent Travel every other Wednesday. You can play, too. Follow us on Twitter @NatGeoTravel and tag your favorite travel stories #NGTRadar to help us find the crème de la crème on the Web. Here are our newest picks.