Tag archives for France

Travels on the Run: Marseille

For National Geographic Books Senior Editor Barbara A. Noe, going on a run is the best way to get oriented in a new city, and a great way to take in the sights. So lace up your sneaks and read on to get Barbara’s tips on where to run in some of the world’s greatest places—and what to see along the way.

I Heart My Island: Île d’Aix

Pierre Antoine Berniard has lived in Germany, Scotland, the United States, Canada, and Jamaica, but his heart belongs to Île d’Aix. “Even when I was abroad, Île d’Aix was my strong roots,” he says. “A sailor would say [that the island is] my point fixe.” And for good reason: Berniard’s familial ties there date back to the early 1700s, when his winemaking forebears came to the island.

Travel Inspiration: Great New Reads

Looking for some travel inspiration? Here are three new #TripLit reads that will transport you to a faraway place.

Drinking Chocolate in Bayonne

The last thing I expected to discover in Bayonne, the scrappy Basque town in southwestern France known for its salt-dried ham, was the most luscious hot chocolate to ever cross my lips, a velvety concoction coiffed with a dome of froth and sipped from a delicate, rose-bedecked porcelain cup in a turn-of-the-century chocolaterie beneath the ancient hulking arcades…

#NGTRadar: Travel Lately

The Radar—the latest and best from the travel blogosphere—is a regular feature on Intelligent Travel every other Wednesday. You can play, too. Follow us on Twitter @NatGeoTravel and tag your favorite travel stories #NGTRadar to help us find the crème de la crème on the Web. Here are our newest picks.

Video: The Gardians of France

Like their American counterparts, the cowboys, France’s gardians cut a dashing figure and loom large in the culture of the southern France. Part of a brotherhood formed in the early 16th century, the gardians are the caretakers of the herds of beautiful gray horses and black bulls that roam the largely unfenced Camargue region.

A Local’s Guide to Quebec City

A 19th-century traveler from France once remarked of Quebec City, “It looked like St.-Malo strayed up here and was lost in the snow.” Though Taras Grescoe has settled in Montreal, an easy three-hour drive away, every time he returns to Quebec City he too succumbs to the illusion that he’s been teleported to the narrow streets of that walled city in Brittany, bewitched by the vista of steeples, horse-drawn calèches, and four-centuries-old ramparts.

Lavender Fields Forever: The Belles of Provence

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If you like Paris in the springtime, you’ll love Provence in the summer. The region’s famous lavender fields burst into full flower at the end of June and last until the beginning of August in a good year. Don’t miss your chance to see–and smell–the fragrant herbs up close and personal this year. Here are three great places to stay while you’re there.

Celebrating Memorial Day, ‘Over There’

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“The village school is just over there,” says the Mayor of Romagne-sous-Montfaucon, site of the largest American cemetery in Europe. “Our teacher taught us a song, and we put flowers on the graves.” Inhaling the lilac-scented air, I’m finding it hard to reconcile that this emerald strip of France’s Lorraine region once roiled with battles along World War I’s infamous western front.

Best of the World: Nantes, France

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Pervaded by a spirit of creativity, Nantes has dreamed up a range of resourceful ideas—from mechanical elephants and art walks to a 15th-century castle turned history museum and a warehouse converted into a hammam.

The Radar: Travel Lately

The Radar: The top travel news, stories, trends, and ideas from across the web. Got Radar? Follow us on Twitter @NatGeoTravel and tag your favorite travel stories with #NGTRadar. Check back on the blog each Wednesday for our Travel Lately roundup.

Nice Bite: Snacking on Socca

Socca is a cross between a crepe and a pancake, a thin disc made with chickpea flour, and it’s a specialty of Nice, the unofficial capital of France’s Cote d’Azur.