Tag archives for Iceland

@NatGeoTravel Staff Bucket List: 2016

The staff at National Geographic Travel is continually criss-crossing the globe to uncover the best and the brightest places, but we have travel wish lists just like everyone else. Here’s where we want to go in 2016 and why.

Iceland’s Elf Obsession

Yes, elves. Fifty-four percent of Icelanders either believe in them or say it’s possible they exist. Here’s how to join in on the fun.

On Location: Five Scene-Stealing ‘Star Wars’ Sets

They may not be in a galaxy far, far away, but exotic locales such as the soaring sand dunes of Abu Dhabi and Iceland’s bubbling calderas help give Star Wars: The Force Awakens—which hits theaters in December—an otherworldly spirit similar to the original trilogy’s.

8 Adventures in Wonderland

Don’t just see the world, seize it. From swimming with whale sharks in Baja California to horseback riding across Mongolia, these eight wild adventures turn vacations into calls to action.

Your Shot Photo of the Month: Icelandic Ice Cave

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Want National Geographic to highlight your photograph? Join our Your Shot community and participate in upcoming hashtag challenges for a chance to appear in “Traveler” magazine and Intelligent Travel.

Trailblazer: Gregg Treinish

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Saving the planet, one scat sample at a time—that’s not the slogan for Adventurers and Scientists for Conservation, but it could be. Founded by Gregg Treinish as a way to benefit the environment through adventure sports, the organization plays matchmaker between information collectors and thrill-seekers and guides groups through the backcountry. Here the Nat Geo emerging explorer shares some of his latest highlights, from Montana to Mongolia.

Journey to the Center of Snæfellsjökull

In 1864, the French novelist Jules Verne published one of his most ambitious works—”Journey to the Center of the Earth.” Though Verne was widely regarded for the meticulous scientific research that informed his writing, what he posited in “Journey” has been rejected: namely, that volcanic tubes lead to the Earth’s core. This, of course, hasn’t stopped curious travelers from exploring the book’s geological protagonist: Iceland’s Snæfellsjökull.

Oh, the Places Nat Geo Goes

When you work at National Geographic, one of the first questions people ask is if you get to travel. The answer is often yes, but one of the best parts of the job is being surrounded by sharp, globe-trotting people, and getting to hear their stories. That’s why we asked folks on National Geographic’s Travel team to share a story about the best trip they’ve taken in the past year with our Intelligent Travel readers.

Best Places to Stay: Northern Lights

If you’ve never seen the northern lights, there’s still time to catch the spectacular display this year. The aurora borealis–named, aptly, after the Roman goddess of dawn and the Greek word for the north wind–can appear on a clear night from September through April, and is often at its most intense in February and March. Here are three stand-out lodges that will get you up close and personal.

#NGTRadar: Travel Lately

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The Radar: The top travel news, stories, trends, and ideas from across the web. Got Radar? Follow us on Twitter @NatGeoTravel and tag your favorite travel stories with #NGTRadar. Check back on the blog each Wednesday for our Travel Lately roundup.

#NGTRadar: Travel Lately

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The Radar: The top travel news, stories, trends, and ideas from across the web. Got Radar? Follow us on Twitter @NatGeoTravel and tag your favorite travel stories with #NGTRadar. Check back on the blog each Wednesday for our Travel Lately roundup.

Volcano Tourism Erupts

Billowing ash from Iceland’s Eyjafjallajökull volcano dashed travel plans in 2010, but travel to the icebound peak has been booming since that eruption grounded millions across Europe. Volcano tourism is flaring up globally, and Iceland isn’t the only hot spot.