Tag archives for intelligent travel

We publish new travel stories all the time on the Intelligent Travel blog network, but there are a few that really got your attention this year.

In case you missed them, here are the 13 most popular posts of 2013.

When Berit Bonde isn’t studying for her master’s degree or working part time in the travel industry, you can find her exploring new places, whether it involves going around the world or just around the corner. Her restless spirit has her moving to Bangkok for half a year, but this Dane says she’ll always return to Copenhagen, where her heart resides. Here are Berit’s recommendations for her beloved capital city.

Photographer Melissa Farlow has shot many stories for National Geographic Magazine – covering everything from the swamps of Florida to the wild horses of the West. She’s also been assigned to capture the spirit of both Chicago and Miami for Traveler. So, when the Detroit feature story came up on the schedule, we knew Melissa was the right…

Spring Trips: Get Your Om On

Spring is here, or just about to be! Time to start planning your out-of-town escapes. And, boy, do we have some ideas for you. Check out our list of Best Spring Trips for 2012. As an added bonus, we’ll be featuring a few extra ideas on the Intelligent Travel blog this week. For those of…

An Expat’s Valparaíso

The Chilean port city of Valparaíso was a correct answer in this year’s big GeoBee competition and, back in 2009, it showed up twice in our November/December issue: We ranked it respectably in our annual Places Rated assessment and we wandered its hilly streets with writer Andrew Evans in the issue’s On Foot section. While…

We’ve Got a New Look

Welcome to the new design for Intelligent Travel! Our most loyal fans will know that IT has undergone several transformations over the years, but this latest sleek and seamless version is all about YOU: we’ve introduced an easy commenting section making it quicker for you to send us your feedback. We’ve also added handy share…

Making the Most of Malta

Last week here on IT, we heard from writer Jeanine Barone who described the hidden treasures of Malta best found on foot. The post garnered a lot of attention on the blog and on our Facebook page. Back by popular demand, we present to you more Malta. Chief Researcher Marilyn Terrell checks-in with Sophie Fraser…

Former Traveler staffer Ashley Thompson gives us a glimpse of travel and food in Western China. Out the bus window, the Wild West of China began to unfurl, as did lush peaks towering over muddy rivers. We whizzed past tiny Sichuan mountain villages, whose daredevil residents sell exotic fruits mere inches from the highway, affording…

Lake Placid With Kids

Last year, Rainer Jenss traveled around the world with his wife and two sons, and blogged about his experience here on Intelligent Travel. Now he’s writing a column that focuses on traveling with kids. When asked for travel advice, I usually recommend people try to visit a place during its “shoulder season” to take advantage…

Fiji: A Tale of Two Cities

Journalist Jeff Fleischer spent 2008 in New Zealand and the South Pacific on a fellowship studying climate change. He sends us this stark look at the state of affairs in Fiji since the 2006 coup. To those who don’t follow current affairs in Oceania, the idea of Fiji usually evokes images of idyllic beaches full…

Notice anything wrong with this picture?  This beach has white sand, seaweed, bathers, tiny waves, rocky cliffs, and is subject to tides, but it’s not on the ocean. Located near the town of Llanes in Asturias in northern Spain, the odd little beach of Gulpiyuri stands by itself in a depression in the middle of…

Adventure Travel with Heart

On the first and last days, it poured rain. At 9,000 feet, I came down with a bad case of bronchitis. At 12,000 feet, my face and my hands swelled disproportionately as a result of altitude sickness. At 15,000 feet, I worried about whether I would make it through at all. Seven days, six nights…

Last night at the monthly DC travel bloggers happy hour I met Carolyn Lane, known to her Twitter followers as @DogMeetsWorld. Lane is a self-proclaimed photo addict, and on her travels in developing countries she loves photographing children. Her life was changed one day when she realized that the child she was photographing had never…

Underground New York

The New York Transit Museum occasionally offers tours of the decommissioned old City Hall Station, the first subway station in New York City. The next tour will be offered on June 19th. The old City Hall station was the starting point for the Interborough Rapid Transit subway (the IRT), which opened with great fanfare on…

Stuck in Paris? 10 Things to Do

As a public service for people who are volcano-waylaid in Paris, cookbook author and pastry chef David Lebovitz has compiled a list of his top ten things to do if you happen to be stranded in his adopted city. His suggestions range from the delicious to the decadent, and include activities that are not expensive,…

Hands-On Architecture

Andy Stocchetti is an architecture student doing an internship in southern India at the Auroville Earth Institute, where he’s learning about sustainable building techniques and blogging about his adventures.  When I came to India, I wanted to get the real Indian experience, but I never imagined I would be standing at the base of a…

After traveling 7,000 miles by bus through the Americas, Andrew Evans found the gold standard of buses in Argentina. As far as buses are concerned, I saved the best for last. I’m so glad. Had I started my journey on an Argentine bus, I would have been spoiled rotten right from the beginning. Every bus…

My City Celebrates: Erin’s London

This year, inspired by our ever-popular “I Heart My City” series on Intelligent Travel, we’re reveling in the holiday season by asking our readers to share their favorite ways to celebrate in their cities. Today’s city-lover is travel writer Erin Maury, and she shares what she loves most about celebrating the holidays in London. What…

This year, inspired by our ever-popular “I Heart My City” series on Intelligent Travel, we’re reveling in the holiday season by asking our readers to share their favorite ways to celebrate in their cities. Today’s city-lover is travel writer Anne-Sophie Redisch, who gives us a glimpse of Oslo. What to share the things that make…

To walk into the restaurant Eatonville in Washington, D.C. is to enter a world dedicated to the memory of Zora Neale Hurston, the Harlem Renaissance writer best known for her book, Their Eyes Were Watching God.  Murals depicting scenes from her life and literature grace the walls, and the menu offers up her favorites like…

This year, inspired by our ever-popular “I Heart My City” series on Intelligent Travel, we’re reveling in the holiday season by asking our readers to share their favorite ways to celebrate in their cities. Today’s city-lover is Brendan McGuigan, who gives us a glimpse of Calgary. What to share the things that make your city…

The Book of Omens

Traveler contributing editor Jim Conaway explores the latest exhibit from D.C.’s Sackler Gallery. You don’t have to believe in divination to be transported by a new exhibit at the Smithsonian’s Arthur M. Sackler Gallery in Washington, D.C., “Falnama: The Book of Omens.” Gorgeous pages from what could be described as royalty’s self-help manuals for fortune-telling…

Pennsylvania Wine Trails

Friend of IT Emily King just got back from York and Adams Counties in southern Pennsylvania, in search of the region’s best food and drink. There are 123 wineries in Pennsylvania. I’m no oenophile, but I was floored by this fact. Amish baskets and potato chips maybe, but wine? Curiosity got the better of me,…

Predicting Tsunamis?

The world has certainly gotten smaller in some ways as global travel allows us access to more and more destinations. But just being able to get somewhere doesn’t mean we can control the weather, or the seismic activity. A powerful underwater earthquake struck the South Pacific on Tuesday, generating a devastating tsunami across the islands…

Traveler photographer Bob Krist recently paid a visit to Paris… Paris, Texas that is. Here, he shares some of the charms of the city on the far, far, left bank of the Seine. It may not be the City of Light, but the world’s second biggest Paris, in northeast Texas, is “worth a sidetrip” (as…