Tag archives for Machu Picchu

When you work at National Geographic, one of the first questions people ask is if you get to travel. The answer is often yes, but one of the best parts of the job is being surrounded by sharp, globe-trotting people, and getting to hear their stories. That’s why we asked folks on National Geographic’s Travel team to share a story about the best trip they’ve taken in the past year with our Intelligent Travel readers.

We publish new travel stories all the time on the Intelligent Travel blog network, but there are a few that really got your attention this year.

In case you missed them, here are the 13 most popular posts of 2013.

The staff at National Geographic Travel is always criss-crossing the globe to uncover the best and the brightest places, but we have travel wish lists just like everyone else. Here’s where we want to go in 2014 and why.

In honor of 125 years of exploration and high adventure, here are four ways National Geographic has made a lasting mark on the world of travel.

While I’ve met a few modern-day nomads in my travels, most of us can’t be on the road all the time. So how can we keep our wanderlust satiated in those stretches between journeys? We can escape into a really good book that brings a far-off place to us. Here are three extraordinary travel narratives that deserve to be counted among the classics.

The Inca built many of these trails 500 years ago, and they’re still the only way to reach all of our destinations—Machu Picchu and also a few seldom visited yet equally impressive Inca sites, such as Choquequirao; the water shrine Picha Unuyoc; and Vilcabamba, also called Espíritu Pampa, the last city of the Inca.

In 1913, National Geographic Magazine dedicated the entirety of its April issue to showcasing the Inca’s “wonderful city of refuge on the mountain top” — and the man who had brought the archaeological treasure to the world’s attention. Here’s a look at Machu Picchu through Hiram Bingham’s eyes, and mine…one hundred years later.

Who doesn’t dream of visiting Machu Picchu? I finally got my chance after hitching a ride on National Geographic’s Around-the-World-by-Private-Jet expedition last week. And while the Inca village in the clouds is exhilarating, there’s much more in the Peruvian highlands for travelers to explore while they’re in the Sacred Valley.

By Aric S. Queen It was a silly thing to think could be done, I told myself as the second and third person passed me on the steep incline. It was done for the attention – the hiking equivalent of holding up the Leaning Tower of Pisa in photos. An online high-five. It shouldn’t be…

Our pick for this week’s #FriFotos* is a classic shot of Machu Picchu emerging from the clouds. The photo was submitted to My Shot by Kate Lindsay and selected by our editors for a Your Peru Photos gallery. Do you want to see one of your photographs featured in National Geographic Traveler magazine, on our website, or on…

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Last night on The Daily Show, former National Geographic Adventure editor and author of the book Turn Right at Machu Picchu, Mark Adams sat down with host Jon Stewart to talk about his book. Watch the hilarious interview above where Stewart grills Adams on trekking in Peru, mule kicking, coca leaves, and the mysterious Explorers Club. Want more from Mark Adams? Check out our interview with the author on Intelligent Travel, then learn more about Machu Picchu from the expert himself by reading his Machu Picchu lists, guides, and tips below:

Turn Right at Machu Picchu

July 24th marks the 100th anniversary of Hiram Bingham’s rediscovery of Machu Picchu, which awoke the world to the beauty and mystery of the “Lost City of the Inca.” Celebrations around the world are happening this summer to commemorate the centennial. Here at the National Geographic Society in Washington D.C., you’ll find a photo exhibit…

The High Road to Ruins

The 100th Anniversary of Machu Picchu’s rediscovery will draw a record number of visitors to the site. Most will make their way through Peru’s Sacred Valley, known more for crowds than authenticity. But one eco-minded outfitter is turning the Camino Salkantay, a backcountry route through unspoiled ecosystems and undisturbed hamlets, into the Next Inca Trail—and…

With less than a month before the 100th anniversary of Machu Picchu’s rediscovery, the L.A. Times continues to celebrate with “100 Facts for 100 Days” leading up to the milestone event. The ancient Inca citadel, and now World Heritage Site, was discovered in Peru in 1911 by Hiram Bingham III, on an expedition funded by…

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On July 24, Peru’s Machu Picchu will celebrate the 100th anniversary of its rediscovery by Yale professor Hiram Bingham III. In honor of this milestone the Los Angeles Times is revealing 100 facts about the UNESCO World Heritage Site, one each day over the 100 days leading up to the anniversary. Today, they reveal number 19.…

Machu Picchu Reopens

This is no April Fools prank: Peru’s iconic destination, Machu Picchu, officially reopens to the public today, after being closed since late January when heavy rains and damaging landslides crippled the routes in and out of the 15th-century Inca citadel. As the most touristed site in South America and the source of 90 percent of…

After massive flooding struck the area around Machu Picchu this January, the country has been struggling to get its tourism back online. Andrew Berg gives us an update on where things currently stand. By the end of January, after days of unremitting rain, deadly mudslides, and flash floods, the swollen Urubamba River eased its rampage…

A Treehouse in Peru

Richard Morgan looks down on the world from his perch in the Peruvian jungle. If you’re going to go so far as to have a private luxury treehouse in the Peruvian Amazon accessible only by Ewok-inspired treetop canopy wooden bridges, it makes sense to have an on-call jungle butler on the ground. For emergencies. Or…