Tag archives for Mexico

Tabasco in the Age of Maya

It may be the end of one calendar era, but the people are still hungry. Tabasco has served as a crossroads for cultures and cuisine ever since the Olmec civilization advanced astronomy, calendar keeping, and other scientific activities that paved the way for the Maya reign. (Photograph by Monica Muller, Flickr)

The Radar: The top travel news, stories, trends, and ideas from across the web. Got Radar? Follow us on Twitter @NatGeoTraveler and tag your favorite travel stories from the Web #ngtradar. Check back on the blog for our roundups.

The Radar: The top travel news, stories, trends, and ideas from across the web. Got Radar? Follow us on Twitter @NatGeoTraveler and tag your favorite travel stories from the Web #ngtradar. Check back on the blog for our roundups. Photograph by Chris White, Flickr.

One minute, you’re snorkeling with colorful parrotfish — the next, you’re surrounded by sea lions, then watching gray whale mothers and their calves perform aquatic arabesques around your kayak. Are you lost in a Wyland mural? Nope — just afloat with National Geographic Expeditions off incomparable Baja California.

This week’s #FriFotos theme is MUSEUMS, so we decided to feature this unbelievable shot that Abelardo de la Torre submitted to the National Geographic Traveler Photo Contest. Sixteen thousand aluminum tiles coat the exterior of the Soumaya Museum in Mexico City.

In a heated scene in the new HBO film, Hemingway & Gellhorn, Ernest Hemingway locks Martha Gellhorn in her hotel room in Spain. He knows his lover well: with a violent war ensuing outside, she’ll step right into the crossfire if given the chance. But when the real-life Gellhorn wasn’t immersed in war, she often locked herself up — in rural retreats around the world. Here are five places where this legendary writer found escape.

Ah, summer vacation. That three-month stretch with no school, no schedule, and plenty of time for family trips. The possibilities were endless back then, weren’t they, when visions of Disney World danced in your head, and the days seemed to last forever. Not every 12-year-old is as well-traveled as Reed Golomb – son of digital media vice…

Eco-Conscious Coffee in Chiapas

No sooner had I set foot on the Argovia Finca Resort, when the owner, Bruno Geisemann, made clear his philosophy: “We need to simply observe and let nature do its work.” Sounds like the utterance of a Zen master, rather than an agronomist. But Bruno Geisemann isn’t your average coffee plantation owner. He walks with…

Going Natural: 5 Authentic, Off-the-Boat Excursions By Raphael Kadushin From the March/April issue of National Geographic Traveler magazine. Subscribe to the print or iPad edition and see all it has to offer. Until recently Cabo San Lucas, sitting at the southern tip of Mexico’s Baja peninsula, got by on its party-town, sand-and-cerveza reputation. But now, fresh…

Our Digital Nomad, Andrew Evans, is on a journey to explore the most significant sites of the ancient Maya in Mexico — and finding (mis)adventures along the way. Read about how Andrew broke into a museum in Camalcalco, cracked the code of the “Maya doomsday prophecy” (it’s shorter than you’d think), and visited the place…

Photos: Where You Went

We are always impressed by our community’s passion for travel and exploration. That’s why every Friday we ask you the same question on Facebook: Where are you traveling this weekend? See photos of where you went. And get inspired to plan your next trip. Photos by readers like you. Upload your favorite travel photos with a caption…

Checking In: Viva Mexico City

These four new boutique hotels provide a stylish base to 
explore the capital’s museums. By Julia Schwietert From the September issue of National Geographic Traveler magazine. El Patio 77 › San Rafael Billed as the city’s first green B&B, El Patio 77 is an ambitious addition to the neighborhood. Partners Alan Vargas and Diego Le Provost renovated…

Our recently announced 2011 Tours of a Lifetime feature story highlights adventures guaranteed to get you out of the hotel and into an experience of a lifetime.  Journey Mexico‘s “Semana Santa Copper Canyon Hiking Trip,” is one such tour: A ten-day expedition through Mexico’s Copper Canyon to visit the Tarahumara people during the Catholic holiday…

Take a closer look. You won’t be splashing around in these falls anytime soon. That’s because what appears to be  water spilling over the cliffs is actually a natural rock formation. Hierve el Agua, which ironically translates as “the water boils,” is located just over 70 kilometers from Oaxaca City in Mexico. The falls, formed…

Cancun’s Disappearing Beach

Contributing editor Charles Kulander offers a reminder to the delegates gathered at the COP 16 climate change conference in Cancun, Mexico this week. As delegates from 193 nations convene at COP 16, the 16th annual climate change conference now meeting in Cancun, local environmentalists point to a pressing sustainability issue right on their doorstep: Ever…

Eat Your Grasshoppers

Emily Chaplin‘s Mexican homestay involved a peculiar yet crunchy snack. I had been duly warned. But somehow, when relaxing outdoors admiring a serene mountain view, the offer of a handful of roasted grasshoppers still managed to catch me off guard. Eyes closed, I reached out my hand, threw the selected victim into my mouth, and…

Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula is crowded with natural wonders, and on Tobias Nowlan‘s recent visit, he was able to experience several of them with the help of local guides. Below, he offers a quick selection of some of the region’s more unusual adventures. @font-face { font-family: “Cambria”; }p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal { margin: 0in 0in 0.0001pt; font-size:…

This is no ordinary reef. British artist Jason de Caires Taylor created these 400 sculptures from casts of real people, and he’s placed them on the ocean floor outside of Mexico’s Isla Mujeres National Marine Park. The work is called “The Silent Evolution,” and is part of the Museo Subacuatico de Arte (MUSA); its aim…

Mexico’s Stone Soup

Sarah Borealis traveled to Mexico on a research trip with Tulane University’s Stone Center for Latin American Studies, and while there, discovered a tasty tradition brewing in El Tule. Below, she describes the ancient tradition of making stone soup. In the summer of 2008, I traveled to the town of El Tule, in the state…

Mexico’s Green Oasis

With its high-rise hotels and crowded beaches, Cancún, Mexico is, in many ways an environmentalist’s tourism nightmare. It would have been easy for the country’s government to keep cashing in on the concrete jungle that lined the coast, but there has been a move in Mexico to think about the long-term environmental impacts of resort…

Cabo Vows

Sheila F. Buckmaster, Traveler editor at large, just came back from a destination wedding in Cabo San Lucas, Mexico. It was my first Destination Wedding–”my” not as in “bride,” but, rather, “guest.” And it was in one very special destination: Cabo San Lucas. Whales, beach, and margaritas. Sunny Mexico, where smiles are in abundance. Good…

Bus2Antarctica: Oh Mexico

Andrew Evans is hightailing it through Mexico and Central America in an effort to catch the Sea Lion, a National Geographic/Lindblad expedition that will take him from Costa Rica to Panama on his way to Antarctica. Here’s a glimpse of what he saw of Mexico from the bus window. The acronym ADO stands for Autobuses…

Andrew Evans is traveling by bus from D.C. to Antarctica and just recently passed through Mexico into Guatemala. After stopping to sleep, he got the chance to describe crossing over the U.S./Mexico border. Most people don’t realize that Texas is nearly as long as it is wide. So it took me nearly eight hours of…

Where the Whales Are

While just about everyone has tinsel, eggnog, and Santa on their minds these days, I’m thinking of heading south of the border to catch a glimpse of the migrating gray whales. Each winter, Pacific gray whales (among many other marine mammal species) cruise about 10,000 miles round trip from their summer feeding grounds in the…

Mexico’s Garden of Art

Sabina Lohr took a break from touristy Cancún, Mexico, and learned that getting off the beaten path is only a few steps away. Just a short ferry hop from Cancún, Mexico, colorful Isla Mujeres is an spot where day-trippers commonly escape for a while from their all-inclusive hotel vacations in the mainland’s hotel zone. This…