Tag archives for National Geographic Traveler

Itching to cash in on some of that well-deserved vacation time in the near future? Join @NatGeoTravel for our next Twitter chat to get the inside scoop on the best fall trips. In addition to hearing from National Geographic Traveler’s own Amy Alipio, who will be unveiling our brand new Best Fall Trips list, we’ll also be welcoming Laura Begley Bloom, executive editor for Yahoo Travel. Use #BestFallTrips to join us!

In a nod to the renaissance transforming South Africa, 
Cape Town has been crowned the World Design Capital of 2014. The art scene here particularly flourishes in the neighborhood of Woodstock, a historically industrial quarter along a shabby stretch of the city’s eastern fringes.

Two years ago, National Geographic Traveler contributing editor Carl Hoffman shared with me an idea for his next book. It struck a chord because when I was ten I was drawn to the subject: the mysterious disappearance in 1961 of Michael Rockefeller in what was then Netherlands New Guinea. Did he drown? Was he shredded by a crocodile or shark? Or, most grisly, was he eaten by cannibals?

I consider travel an enlightening experience, but it never occurred to me that beams of light might change the way we travel. Recently, lighting scientists (yes, they exist) have dissected the specific wavelengths of electric light to better understand how they affect our bodies. “Hotels will offer guest rooms with lights that help us to…

Tucked into the peaks of Toubkal National Park, named for North Africa’s highest summit, a crop of modern guesthouses has transformed Imlil, Morocco–once known as a no-frills base camp–into a comfortable retreat for day hikers.

Brooklyn is known for all the writers who live there: You can find them frowning at their laptops in their neighborhood cafes, donning their noise-canceling headphones to block out the clamor of the only other comparably populous group–children under five. As luck would have it, Nell Freudenberger’s Brooklyn lies at the intersection of these two sets of scribblers.

San Antonio, Texas, has long been known as the site of the infamous showdown at the Alamo, but the sophisticated city is attracting attention for a lot more these days. A recent $358 million River Walk face-lift connects visitors to downtown and new businesses and outdoor works projects along the river inject new life into this American classic.

I’m driving north through Berkshire County, Massachusetts, returning as a guest lecturer to Williams College, my alma mater, just shy of the Vermont state line. It’s two days after a deep snowfall and the broad-shouldered, smoothly curving highway is nearly empty of traffic. But the rearview mirror of my mind is all swirling stage lights and marijuana smoke, twinkling fireflies and thundering bass lines.

In the 1930s and ’40s, Bologna was the capital of finely crafted men’s shoes. Though few of the 1,850 workshops from that time remain, Peron & Peron continues to painstakingly craft handmade shoes to order. Here’s a look at the distinctive cordwainers and other authentic artisans in this distinctive northern Italian city.

“Immersing yourself in the Great Barrier Reef is the best way to see how fragile it is,” says Ben Southall, who has served as the reef’s honorary “caretaker of islands” and retraced Captain Cook’s route of discovery there, by kayak. Approximately one million visitors dive or snorkel the the largest coral reef ecosystem in the world each year. “It’s the vastness and marine life that draws people in,” says Southall. Here are a few tips to get started if experiencing Queensland’s greatest treasure is on your travel list this year.

Traveler Editor at Large Christopher Elliott is the magazine’s consumer advocate and ombudsman. Over the past 15 years he has helped countless readers fix their trips. Here’s his latest advice.

A confession: I don’t play golf, partly because I’m unable to reconcile my conservation work with a sport also known for habitat destruction, massive water consumption, and heavy use of chemicals. Now the sport may be about to take a big step, in a surprising place.

When someone mentions ramen, you probably think of those store-bought dried noodles you bring to life with boiling water and a packet of spices.

In Tokyo, ramen noodle soup is not fast food; it’s an art form.

Meet the Editor: Isabella Brega

Isabella Brega, the executive editor of Traveler’s Italian partner magazine, put together a buyer’s guide to authentic goods in Italy, highlighting 20 places in five different cities where you can witness craftsmanship in its highest form–from marionettes to mandolins. “The story of Italian artisans is one of valuables and values,” she writes. Here’s a brief look at Touring’s creative maven and her singular view of the world.

If these cliffs look familiar, it’s because they brood over the key crime scene in the transatlantic TV hit Broadchurch. Rising as if ripped from Earth’s crust, the formation has always seemed positioned for dramatic effect. In fact, show creator Chris Chibnall calls the murder mystery a love letter to his home in West Dorset, a classic British seaside town served up in one of England’s most family-friendly settings.

National Geographic Traveler magazine publishes 14 international editions in 12 languages. I read–or look at, when there’s a language barrier–them all. They are a window on the world, reflecting the personalities, interests, dream destinations, and visual expressions of their readerships.

Traveler Editor at Large Andrew McCarthy kept a home on Maui for nearly a decade in the late 1980s and early ’90s. “I always passed through Hawaii’s state capital as quickly as I could—a blemish on the face of paradise, was my uninformed opinion” he writes. Here he returns to Honolulu and goes beyond the mai tais and tiki torches to find a true-blue—and truly global—American city.

Amy Alipio is an associate editor–and in-house #TripLit guru–at National Geographic Traveler magazine. Here are a few fun facts about this erudite explorer.

Whether you’re exploring the Galápagos or visiting glaciers, South America is just the place to unplug from routine life. Consider staying at one of these lodges for a truly unforgettable nature experience.

Pete McBride has been adding a flash of panache to Traveler for roughly 15 years. “He brings the whole package to the magazine, ” says Director of Photography Dan Westergren. Though McBride started off making his name as a photographer, he has the literary chops to handle both text and images for feature stories–which is rare. And, as Dan notes, he has something else going for him: “the curiosity to find out what makes the world tick.” Here’s a small peek into the life and times of Pete McBride.

Do you travel with passion and purpose–or know someone who does? Tell us! This year will mark the third anniversary of Traveler’s award-winning “Travelers of the Year” package–the culmination of the magazine’s quest to find, and shine a light on, individuals who are using the power of travel for good. In our end-of-summer issue, Traveler will proudly present a fresh class of Travelers of the Year–but we have to find them first! We will be accepting nominations until February 6, so send yours in today!

Louisville’s whiskey revolution is making a splash.

If you’re like me, you drink water from a glass or a reusable container when you’re home or about town. When you travel, it’s a different story. Throwaway plastic bottles remain the most convenient way for hotels to distribute water, generating trash that often ends up in our oceans. But the tide is turning, thanks to the Whole World Water campaign.

South Carolina’s Charleston offers a kid-pleasing combination of history and fun. Here’s a look at four ways to enjoy some quality family time in this charming Southern city.

Miami has a certain rep: the party vibe, the heat, the pricey booze. But the city Hannah Sampson of the Miami Herald likes to show off—the one that makes this tourist mecca a hometown—charms with quiet parks, cultural gems, Latin flair, and, of course, gorgeous water views. Here’s Hannah’s guide to the chill side of Miami.