Tag archives for new orleans

Each spring, thousands of bloggers and entrepreneurs flock to the Mom 2.0 Summit for a weekend of workshops and networking. This year, I joined in on the fun to see what this travel-savvy group had to recommend when it came to outstanding kid-friendly destinations in the United States. Here are eight places all across America to consider adding to your family-travel bucket list.

Great Family Trips: New Orleans

The family vacation, like the concept of family itself, has evolved. Kids are traveling with grandma or a single parent or an indulgent uncle (or all three). However you define your kin, this Southern itinerary is all relative.

Bananas Foster was invented at Brennan’s of New Orleans in 1951. After the restaurant’s 2013 closure and expansive refurbishing, the flammable, rum-soaked dessert will once again light up the French Quarter.

A new year calls for new additions to travel to-do lists. To get inspired, we asked our Nat Geo Travel Facebook fans to share their picks for 2015’s must-visit destinations.

Louisiana, Three Ways: Atchafalaya Swamp

I’m in Killer Poboys to meet with Charles Chamberlain, a Ph.D. in American history and local History Man. Ten years a historian at the Louisiana State Museum before setting up his own company, Historia, to provide outsiders with insights into the Pelican State, Chamberlain knows Louisiana. He’s just the guy, I figure, to explain why Louisiana is so different, even a…

Louisiana, Three Ways: NOLA

Homegrown, unique, and thoroughly wonderful, Louisiana has a character all its own. “[It] is another country,” local historian Charles Chamberlain says. “But you better see it soon; who knows how long it’s going to last.” By the time Thomas Jefferson bought the land from Napoleon in that 1803 geopolitical fire sale, he explains, this French colony was well populated with French and Spanish immigrants, refugees from Haiti, and Congolese slaves, all of whom had seeded the land with their cultures, foods, and traditions. Here’s a look at New Orleans.

#StrangePlanet: Travel Trivia

Truth is stranger than fiction. Here are five travel factoids to help prove it: Bogged down: Every August, competitors in the World Bog Snorkeling Championship flipper their way to glory in a water-filled trench cut into a peat bog outside the tiny Welsh town of Llanwrtyd Wells.   Still around: Chugging along since 1835, the St. Charles…

NOLA Like a Local

“Eat Local” may be a national trend, but in steamy, dreamy New Orleans the focus is on local living. The Crescent City is fiercely devoted to its homegrown traditions–be they culinary, musical, cultural, or otherwise. Though some of our habits and haunts–like gumbo, go-cups, and the French Quarter–are famous the world over, others remain a bit more elusive to visitors. Here are just a few of them.

New Orleans native Caroline Gerdes may have recently moved to Washington, D.C., but she loves her hometown. So much so that she recently spent a year–with the help of a National Geographic grant–of her life working on an oral history project about the Ninth Ward, where her father grew up, to document the community’s rich history and culture–especially the edible aspects. Here are some of Caroline’s favorite things about the city she’s proud to call home.

Comments Off on The Best Dirty Rice in New Orleans

Looks can be deceiving. Take the case of dirty rice, the lumpy, scruffy one-pot dish eaten throughout Cajun country–and beyond–as a side or, occasionally, a main course.

The Radar: Travel Lately

The Radar: The top travel news, stories, trends, and ideas from across the web. Got Radar? Follow us on Twitter @NatGeoTravel and tag your favorite travel stories with #NGTRadar. Check back on the blog each Wednesday for our Travel Lately roundup.

After poring through hundreds of candidates in the U.S., here are 11 iconic venues where it’s more about the experience of being there, than who happens to be on stage.

Comments Off on Event-o-Rama: 12 Must-Dos in April

There are some amazing events on tap all over the world, all the time. Here’s a taste of what you can see and do in April.

For New Orleans natives, it’s a hard-won honor to ride in a Carnival parade. So when I was offered the chance to ride with the Krewe of Orpheus this year, it was kind of like a childhood dream coming true. Especially because Orpheus is a super krewe.

When it comes to Mardis Gras, tourists are usually surprised to find that traditions dictate when to party, what to wear, and how to behave. From crowded parties to wild costumes, the revelry may appear chaotic, but locals know there’s a method to the madness.

There are some amazing events on tap all over the world, all the time. Here’s a taste of what you can see and do in February.

The chocolate chip cookie is about as American as it gets. Urban Insider Annie Fitzsimmons got the scoop from local luminaries around the U.S. on the must-eat cookies in their cities.

Cajun or Creole?

A brief primer on the difference between the two terms from National Geographic Young Explorer Caroline Gerdes, a New Orleans native.

National Geographic Young Explorer grantee Caroline Gerdes reveals the top five food quirks about her hometown of New Orleans.

Comments Off on The Strangely Comforting World of Voodoo

“Get back in here!” Miriam stood in doorway watching an embarrassed man in his mid-30s shouting at a woman who was running down the street screaming. “What is going on with that girl?” she laughed. “Oh she… she just gets scared easily,” he said. Miriam shut the door and turned to me. “Some people these days, they’ve just gone crazy.” She smiled, but you could tell that her feelings were a little bit hurt. And you could tell that it wasn’t the first time something like this had happened. But, then again, when you run one of the most famous Voodoo temples in the U.S., you have to expect a few faint-of-hearts to cross your path.

I’ve been going about this all wrong, this looking for good in every city I visit. See, there was an assumption that if someone was doing some real good, then they’d have an office with a big sign, or a business card…something to suggest or confirm the goodness. But that’s not always true. When I jumped in a cab a few days ago in New Orleans, I met someone who was doing good without even knowing it.

“No.” I’m confused. Two days earlier, I had met filmmaker Brian Paul in New Orleans while he was promoting his documentary, Cure For the Crash, a fascinating look inside the minds of “train hoppers.” I told him I wanted to learn about the “art” of hopping, and he agreed to meet me across the river.

“What do you mean ‘No?,’” I ask, not even trying to hide my annoyance.

The Pit Bull “Problem”

Dr. Seuss had one. Helen Keller claims they’re one of the best therapy dogs. Jon Stewart has two – and they watch over his young children. But these aren’t the stories you hear when you hear about pit bulls.

This spring brings the War of 1812 bicentennial to life in a most audacious way: with the kind of sailing ships that made the war a test of nerves for a young, unproven navy and civilian privateers. One way to relive that chapter in history is to head for the water. The Navy has collaborated with Operation Sail, the group that rounded up dozens of ghostly tall ships for the U.S. bicentennial in 1976, to arrange similar spectacles in U.S. cities this year.

By Monica C. Corcoran, senior photo editor at NationalGeographic.com I knew I had a problem when a coworker asked how long I’d been going to Jazz Fest and I couldn’t remember if it was 17 … or was it 18 years? It’s my annual pilgrimage to the promised land of lip-smacking food and hip-shaking music,…