Tag archives for new orleans

Beyond the Quarter: The Perfect Day in New Orleans

The 21st century granted two of New Orleans’ historic 19th-century working-class neighborhoods a new lease on life: Faubourg Marigny and Bywater. Here, your guide to spending the perfect day in these downriver treasures.

Instant Connoisseur: Raw Oysters

Oysters improve water quality by acting as filters. And, when coupled with the fact that they lack central nervous systems, the bivalves pass the test for even the most ethically minded eaters. Need more incentive? Scientists say Casanova, who allegedly downed 50 a day, was right about that aphrodisiac thing.

Travel With a Twist: The World in Cocktails

Can’t afford a plane ticket? Toast these world-class destinations through their signature cocktails.

Family-Friendly America: 8 Places to Add to Your List

Each spring, thousands of bloggers and entrepreneurs flock to the Mom 2.0 Summit for a weekend of workshops and networking. This year, I joined in on the fun to see what this travel-savvy group had to recommend when it came to outstanding kid-friendly destinations in the United States. Here are eight places all across America to consider adding to your family-travel bucket list.

Great Family Trips: New Orleans

The family vacation, like the concept of family itself, has evolved. Kids are traveling with grandma or a single parent or an indulgent uncle (or all three). However you define your kin, this Southern itinerary is all relative.

Local Flavor: Bananas Foster in the Big Easy

Bananas Foster was invented at Brennan’s of New Orleans in 1951. After the restaurant’s 2013 closure and expansive refurbishing, the flammable, rum-soaked dessert will once again light up the French Quarter.

Reader Recs: Bucket List 2015

A new year calls for new additions to travel to-do lists. To get inspired, we asked our Nat Geo Travel Facebook fans to share their picks for 2015’s must-visit destinations.

Louisiana, Three Ways: Atchafalaya Swamp

I’m in Killer Poboys to meet with Charles Chamberlain, a Ph.D. in American history and local History Man. Ten years a historian at the Louisiana State Museum before setting up his own company, Historia, to provide outsiders with insights into the Pelican State, Chamberlain knows Louisiana. He’s just the guy, I figure, to explain why Louisiana is so different, even a…

Louisiana, Three Ways: NOLA

Homegrown, unique, and thoroughly wonderful, Louisiana has a character all its own. “[It] is another country,” local historian Charles Chamberlain says. “But you better see it soon; who knows how long it’s going to last.” By the time Thomas Jefferson bought the land from Napoleon in that 1803 geopolitical fire sale, he explains, this French colony was well populated with French and Spanish immigrants, refugees from Haiti, and Congolese slaves, all of whom had seeded the land with their cultures, foods, and traditions. Here’s a look at New Orleans.

#StrangePlanet: Travel Trivia

Truth is stranger than fiction. Here are five travel factoids to help prove it: Bogged down: Every August, competitors in the World Bog Snorkeling Championship flipper their way to glory in a water-filled trench cut into a peat bog outside the tiny Welsh town of Llanwrtyd Wells.   Still around: Chugging along since 1835, the St. Charles…

NOLA Like a Local

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“Eat Local” may be a national trend, but in steamy, dreamy New Orleans the focus is on local living. The Crescent City is fiercely devoted to its homegrown traditions–be they culinary, musical, cultural, or otherwise. Though some of our habits and haunts–like gumbo, go-cups, and the French Quarter–are famous the world over, others remain a bit more elusive to visitors. Here are just a few of them.

I Heart My City: Caroline’s New Orleans

New Orleans native Caroline Gerdes may have recently moved to Washington, D.C., but she loves her hometown. So much so that she recently spent a year–with the help of a National Geographic grant–of her life working on an oral history project about the Ninth Ward, where her father grew up, to document the community’s rich history and culture–especially the edible aspects. Here are some of Caroline’s favorite things about the city she’s proud to call home.