Tag archives for Peru

In a nod to the Society’s yearlong focus on food, we asked our National Geographic Travel Facebook fans to share the best lip-smacking street eats they’ve sampled around the globe. Their answers left us hungry for more (and wanting to book a ticket to Southeast Asia). So grab a snack and join us on a tour of…

In the 1950s, Peru’s Cabo Blanco Fishing Club was a famous rod-and-reel outpost—the world record black marlin, weighing 1,560 pounds, was caught here. Ernest Hemingway visited, along with other celebs. Now the classic coastal village and some 2,500 square miles of ocean around it could become part of a new ecotourism project—or be turned over to more oil drilling platforms.

There are some amazing events on tap all over the world, all the time. Here’s a taste of what you can see and do in September.

Lima is in full throttle. Lunch rolls seamlessly into dinner. 
Dancing keeps going long after last call. Across the more than a thousand-square-mile sprawl of Peru’s capital, from the working-class Chorrillos barrio to highbrow San Isidro and along the glorious Pacific coastline, pure urban exhilaration reigns, and just about all of the 8.8 million inhabitants are caught up in it.

Pacaya-Samiria National Reserve is one of the largest tracts of protected land in Peru at more than five millions acres. Thanks to a cadre of paid and volunteer rangers, only two percent of this Amazonian wonderland–hemmed in between the Marañon River and the Puinahua Channel–has been logged.

Five Family Travel Resolutions

I don’t believe in New Year’s resolutions. But as winter continues its march (at least where I live in New York City), I’ve been dreaming up a few travel goals for 2014. Some are places, some are new services, all are experiences that will make this year of travel the best one yet.

There are some amazing events on tap all over the world, all the time. Here’s a taste of what you can see and do in February.

Elie Gardner, a freelance photographer who contributes to Traveler magazine, grew up in a tiny town in North Dakota. Work brought her to Peru’s capital city in late 2010, and she’s been there ever since. Elie loves speaking Spanish, trying new foods, seeking out cultural experiences, and finding hidden gems in her husband’s hometown. Here are some of her favorite things about Lima.

The Inca built many of these trails 500 years ago, and they’re still the only way to reach all of our destinations—Machu Picchu and also a few seldom visited yet equally impressive Inca sites, such as Choquequirao; the water shrine Picha Unuyoc; and Vilcabamba, also called Espíritu Pampa, the last city of the Inca.

In 1913, National Geographic Magazine dedicated the entirety of its April issue to showcasing the Inca’s “wonderful city of refuge on the mountain top” — and the man who had brought the archaeological treasure to the world’s attention. Here’s a look at Machu Picchu through Hiram Bingham’s eyes, and mine…one hundred years later.

Lima’s Bohemian Rhapsody

Around the turn of the century, a salon society emerged in Barranco, an intimate seaside enclave southeast of Peru’s capital city center. As those bright young things gradually moved on, they left behind an architectural kaleidoscope that artists and musicians transformed into a unique cultural olio. By the 1970s, the Barranco scene was on the wane, but, happily, it’s experiencing a resurgence: “When people in Lima look for something fun, artistic, or bohemian, they end up here.”

When it’s cold outside, you either want to embrace (even celebrate) it — or you want to get as far away from it as you can. Here are a few of our Urban Insider’s favorite places to spend a week in winter — from the Alps to the islands.

Where Do You Want to Go in 2013?

National Geographic Traveler staff answer the question “If you could visit just ONE place in 2013, where would it be and why.” Check out what’s at the top of our travel to-do lists next year, then let us know where you would go for a chance to appear in an upcoming issue of Traveler magazine.

The Radar: Travel Lately

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The Radar: The top travel news, stories, trends, and ideas from across the web. Got Radar? Follow us on Twitter @NatGeoTraveler and tag your favorite travel stories from the Web #ngtradar. Check back on the blog on Wednesdays for our round ups.

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The Radar: The top travel news, stories, trends, and ideas from across the web. Got Radar? Follow us on Twitter @NatGeoTraveler and tag your favorite travel stories from the Web #ngtradar. Check back on the blog for our roundups. Photograph by Ernesto Ghigna, My Shot

Though writer Robert Earle Howells adds greater fuel to our wanderlust fires with his round-up of five Peruvian jungle lodges in National Geographic Traveler’s new issue, now’s unfortunately not the time to visit the Amazon Basin. Super-floods continue to inundate the region — a situation that has been underreported in the English-language U.S. media so…

By Aric S. Queen It was a silly thing to think could be done, I told myself as the second and third person passed me on the steep incline. It was done for the attention – the hiking equivalent of holding up the Leaning Tower of Pisa in photos. An online high-five. It shouldn’t be…

Photos: Where You Went

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Our readers boast impressive travel résumés, which is why every Friday we ask you the same question on Facebook: Where are you traveling this weekend? See photos of where YOU went, and get inspired to plan your next trip. Photos by readers like you. Upload your favorite travel photos with a caption to Your Shot/Travel at ngm.com/yourshot. Tag all…

#FriFotos: Lima, Peru

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In our #FriFotos pick of the week, nighttime revelers enjoy the spray of a fountain in Lima, the capital city of Peru. The photo was submitted to our My Shot community by Jeff Hartman and was selected by our editors for a Your Peru Photos gallery. Do you want to see one of your photographs featured in National…

Photos: Where You Went

We are always impressed by our community’s passion for travel and exploration. That’s why every Friday we ask you the same question on Facebook: Where are you traveling this weekend? See photos of where you went. And be inspired to plan your next trip. Photos by readers like you. Upload your favorite travel photos with a caption…

Our pick for this week’s #FriFotos* is a classic shot of Machu Picchu emerging from the clouds. The photo was submitted to My Shot by Kate Lindsay and selected by our editors for a Your Peru Photos gallery. Do you want to see one of your photographs featured in National Geographic Traveler magazine, on our website, or on…

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Last night on The Daily Show, former National Geographic Adventure editor and author of the book Turn Right at Machu Picchu, Mark Adams sat down with host Jon Stewart to talk about his book. Watch the hilarious interview above where Stewart grills Adams on trekking in Peru, mule kicking, coca leaves, and the mysterious Explorers Club. Want more from Mark Adams? Check out our interview with the author on Intelligent Travel, then learn more about Machu Picchu from the expert himself by reading his Machu Picchu lists, guides, and tips below:

Turn Right at Machu Picchu

July 24th marks the 100th anniversary of Hiram Bingham’s rediscovery of Machu Picchu, which awoke the world to the beauty and mystery of the “Lost City of the Inca.” Celebrations around the world are happening this summer to commemorate the centennial. Here at the National Geographic Society in Washington D.C., you’ll find a photo exhibit…

The High Road to Ruins

The 100th Anniversary of Machu Picchu’s rediscovery will draw a record number of visitors to the site. Most will make their way through Peru’s Sacred Valley, known more for crowds than authenticity. But one eco-minded outfitter is turning the Camino Salkantay, a backcountry route through unspoiled ecosystems and undisturbed hamlets, into the Next Inca Trail—and…

With less than a month before the 100th anniversary of Machu Picchu’s rediscovery, the L.A. Times continues to celebrate with “100 Facts for 100 Days” leading up to the milestone event. The ancient Inca citadel, and now World Heritage Site, was discovered in Peru in 1911 by Hiram Bingham III, on an expedition funded by…