Tag archives for photo tips

I often fantasize about heading out the door with just one camera hanging around my neck. But when I go on the road to take pictures for Traveler that’s not really possible. Because I’m supposed to get great photos no matter what, I often need to rely on different lenses to make a situation look more photogenic than it might in real life. But there are benefits to traveling light when you’re out making pictures.

Reader Question: How do I tell a story with photographs?

Photographers, charge your batteries and clear your memory cards! The cherry blossoms are in peak bloom along the Tidal Basin in Washington, D.C., and we know you’re dying to get that perfect shot.

Reader question:

Is it true that a great landscape image will almost always be better if there’s a human presence in it?

My answer:

It depends on the intended use of the picture.

Who doesn’t want to be a travel photographer and earn their keep by exploring the world and capturing its essence for the rest of us to see? I know I do.

I was lucky enough to sit in on one of Traveler’s photo seminars earlier this month, led by award-winning photographer Jim Richardson and the magazine’s senior photo editor Dan Westergren. Though Jim and Dan believe in the importance of technique, they stressed that “the secret is in how you look at the world, not in how you turn the dials on the camera.”

Here are a few of Jim and Dan’s tips on how to get into the right frame of mind when you’re making pictures.

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From the new book, National Geographic Complete Photography, an extensive photo reference guide packed with tips, how-tos, galleries, and stories from Nat Geo’s top photographers including Annie Griffiths, Steve McCurry, Frans Lanting, and Jodi Cobb. Get your copy now. Travel is about escape, and the urge to get away often leads to the countryside. Make the…