Tag archives for photography

Pete McBride has been adding a flash of panache to Traveler for roughly 15 years. “He brings the whole package to the magazine, ” says Director of Photography Dan Westergren. Though McBride started off making his name as a photographer, he has the literary chops to handle both text and images for feature stories–which is rare. And, as Dan notes, he has something else going for him: “the curiosity to find out what makes the world tick.” Here’s a small peek into the life and times of Pete McBride.

I often fantasize about heading out the door with just one camera hanging around my neck. But when I go on the road to take pictures for Traveler that’s not really possible. Because I’m supposed to get great photos no matter what, I often need to rely on different lenses to make a situation look more photogenic than it might in real life. But there are benefits to traveling light when you’re out making pictures.

When can you call yourself a “professional” photographer? Is it when you buy an expensive camera, sell a picture, or get published? No one seems to agree.

The 25th annual National Geographic Traveler Photo Contest has been a long, strange, and beautiful trip. We loved every minute of it, and we hope you did, too. Here are this year’s winners.

How to Capture the Moment

Reader Question: I’ve heard photographers talk about capturing the moment. What does that mean?

Reader Question: How do I become a photographer for National Geographic?

My Answer: Photography is really no different than any other pursuit in life if you plan to make a living at it.

Photo Tip: All About Exposure

Reader Question: Which exposure mode should I use with my camera? What’s the difference between “Auto” and “A”?

Can You Make the Cut?

The 25th annual Traveler Photo Contest is moving full steam ahead, and we’ll be publishing the first round of stand-out submissions in each category — Outdoor Scenes, Sense of Place, Spontaneous Moments, and Travel Portraits — next week.

Enter today for your chance to have your entry featured appear on the National Geographic website in the first batch of galleries.

Reader Question: What is meant by good composition and how do I achieve it?

Photographers, charge your batteries and clear your memory cards! The cherry blossoms are in peak bloom along the Tidal Basin in Washington, D.C., and we know you’re dying to get that perfect shot.

The National Geographic Traveler Photo Contest just got underway, and we’re off to a great start so far. The magazine will be awarding seriously spectacular prizes this year, so don’t miss your chance to win. Enter today!

In 1913, National Geographic Magazine dedicated the entirety of its April issue to showcasing the Inca’s “wonderful city of refuge on the mountain top” — and the man who had brought the archaeological treasure to the world’s attention. Here’s a look at Machu Picchu through Hiram Bingham’s eyes, and mine…one hundred years later.

Reader question:

Is it true that a great landscape image will almost always be better if there’s a human presence in it?

My answer:

It depends on the intended use of the picture.

Husband-and-wife photography powerhouse Cotton Coulson and Sisse Brimberg have been shooting for the National Geographic Society for years. They recently traveled to St. Petersburg to photograph the city for a recent Traveler feature. The magazine’s photo editor Krista Rossow caught up with the pair to get the behind-the-lens scoop about their shoot and how the city has changed since the Soviet era.

Who doesn’t want to be a travel photographer and earn their keep by exploring the world and capturing its essence for the rest of us to see? I know I do.

I was lucky enough to sit in on one of Traveler’s photo seminars earlier this month, led by award-winning photographer Jim Richardson and the magazine’s senior photo editor Dan Westergren. Though Jim and Dan believe in the importance of technique, they stressed that “the secret is in how you look at the world, not in how you turn the dials on the camera.”

Here are a few of Jim and Dan’s tips on how to get into the right frame of mind when you’re making pictures.

The Radar: The top travel news, stories, trends, and ideas from across the web. Got Radar? Follow us on Twitter @NatGeoTraveler and tag your favorite travel stories from the Web #ngtradar. Check back on the blog for our roundups. Photograph by Jeremie Noel, My Shot.

The Radar: The top travel news, stories, trends, and ideas from across the web. Got Radar? Follow us on Twitter @NatGeoTraveler and tag your favorite travel stories from the Web #ngtradar. Check back on the blog for our roundups. Photograph by Kristian Leven, My Shot.

The Radar: The top travel news, stories, trends, and ideas from across the web. Got Radar? Follow us on Twitter @NatGeoTraveler and tag your favorite travel stories from the Web #ngtradar. Check back on the blog for our roundups. Photograph by Poras Chaudhary, My Shot.

Our resident Scotland expert, Jim Richardson, has been traveling to the Highlands and Lowlands for more than 15 years — and after enjoying a few “wee drams” over the years, he’s become a discerning (and poetic) Scotch enthusiast. We asked Jim to tell us if he has a favorite whisky. And, as it turns out, he has far more than a few.

Jim Richardson is a familiar name from the pages of both National Geographic Magazine and National Geographic Traveler. And if you’ve followed his career, you may have noticed his passion for Scotland (check out his newest piece, about the Inner Hebrides, in Traveler’s hot-off-the-press August/September 2012 issue). Traveler photo editor Krista Rossow interviewed Jim about photography and why Scotland remains his enduring travel muse. Here’s what he had to say.

The Radar: The top travel news, stories, trends, and ideas from across the web. Got Radar? Follow us on Twitter @NatGeoTraveler and tag your favorite travel stories from the Web #ngtradar. Check back on the blog for our roundups. Photograph by Vinod Krishnan, My Shot.

The National Geographic Traveler Photo Contest is in its final stretches, and we’re seeing some great talent out there this year (check out our galleries)! The magazine is giving away seriously spectacular prizes this year, so you won’t want to miss your chance to win. The deadline is July 11th, but the entry fee ($15) goes up $10 in the last two weeks of the contest — starting this Thursday, June 28 — so save yourself a sawbuck and submit your best travel photo(s) today.

The Radar: The top travel news, stories, trends, and ideas from across the web. Got Radar? Follow us on Twitter @NatGeoTraveler and tag your favorite travel stories from the Web #ngtradar. Check back on the blog for our roundups.

Photographer Robert J. Szabo specializes in wet plate collodion photography, a technique that was used during the Civil War, to photograph modern day battle sites and reenactors. National Geographic Traveler published his past-meets-present images in our latest issue. Read on as photo editor Krista Rossow asks Robert about his interest in wet plate photography, then check out our audio slideshow to hear about how he achieves his signature 19th-century look.

Behind the Lens in Jerusalem

Photojournalist Alexandra Avakian’s coverage of Egypt appeared in the September 2011 issue of Traveler, and you can see the fruits of her labor in a story about Jerusalem in the May issue. Photo editor Krista Rossow asked Alexandra what it was like going on assignment in a city with such a long and complicated history. This is what she had to say.