Tag archives for road trip

Portugal is made for wanderers. From the top of the Moorish remnants of Castelo de São Jorge, Lisbon cascades downhill in all directions, new paths beckoning at every turn. Surf camps dot the 215-mile stretch south of the storied capital city. Part of the region known as the Alentejo, this shore is far quieter than the Algarve beaches at the country’s southern edge.

I set off from Miami without an agenda. I was headed south to Key West on the famous Overseas Highway and wanted to let serendipity lead the way. With only a short amount of time on my hands, I didn’t want to be saddled with an endless list of to-dos. Here’s what I found on my…

This was the first wellness-focused road trip I’d ever taken, so I wasn’t sure what to expect or how the experience would differ from past trips — especially from my first Curious Traveler road adventure. Eventually, I got my head on straight and thought about what I might really need. In the end, here’s what made the cut.

It’s Go Time!

What does wellness mean? How do you get there? That’s exactly what I’ll be exploring as I travel the Southwest in search of places that embody and embrace this way of living.

Our Curious Traveler, Shannon Switzer, is taking a trip down the Road to Wellness to uncover off-the-beaten-path places and experiences that rejuvenate mind, body, and spirit. The adventure begins this Monday, April 8th. Follow Shannon’s journey on Twitter @CuriousTraveler and on Instagram @ShannonSwitzer.

Comments Off

The Radar: The top travel news, stories, trends, and ideas from across the web. Got Radar? Follow us on Twitter @NatGeoTraveler and tag your favorite travel stories from the Web #ngtradar. Check back on the blog for our roundups. Photograph courtesy Darren Vaughan, My Shot.

Like many people, I find it much easier to be in a constant state of curiosity when I’m on the road, in new surroundings, than when I’m going about my daily routine. So, as I wound up my epic road trip adventure in Coronado on July 4th, I had to ask myself: How can I continue to be a curious traveler at home?

Wrangling Under the Big Sky

Wanda Wilcox is the real deal. She has an elk-tooth wedding ring, rides bulls, and eats their, ahem, manhood (which she claims is tasty). She’s the fifth generation of homesteaders who cut a trail from Oregon to “Big Sky” country.

A friendly Seattlite informed me that Washington received more snowfall than any other state this year, which, in the summer, translates to great white water rafting. I liked the sound of this.

I am not a coffee drinker. I usually prefer the leaf over the bean. But when I crossed from Bainbridge Island to Seattle via the ferry, I was very damp and very cold. Seattle was damp and cold too, which meant there was only one thing to do. When in Rome, right?

Photos: Olympic Vistas

When I finally reunited with the coast after leaving Portland, the weather went from hot and dry to wet and soggy. The trend continued as I made my way toward Olympic National Park, which gets an average of 150 inches (380 cm) of rain each year. Here are a few photos that capture my quick hop through the Olympic Peninsula.

Tipi-cal Life in Oregon

“This is what we call the chicken tunnel,” Susanne said, pointing at a few plucky hens as they scuttled from their outdoor pen to their coop. “Two paths converged — the people one and the chicken one,” she said. “So we figured we could have them go over or under.” I laughed as I pictured a chicken bridge. She was giving me a tour of the grounds where she and her partner Ken run the Tipi Village Retreat in the verdant Marcola, Oregon, just a half hour northeast of Eugene.

Thanks and Goodbye: Part 2

After four revisions of this, my final blog entry to you all (and proving Hemingway’s theory on first drafts), I’ve come to the conclusion that this needs to be split into two parts. One from The Good Traveler. And one from me – Aric S. Queen. This is Two.

After four revisions of this, my final blog entry to you all (and proving Hemingway’s theory on first drafts), I’ve come to the conclusion that this needs to be split into two parts. One from The Good Traveler. And one from me – Aric S. Queen. This is Part One.

Happy Mistakes in the Mission

My friend told me about a monster drawing rally that was going down at the Verdi Club in San Francisco’s Mission District while I was in town, and I couldn’t believe my good luck. Artists competing to draw the most fantastical monsters imaginable? Sign me up.

When I pulled up to Arcosanti, architect Paolo Soleri’s experimental town in the middle of the Arizona desert, I saw a large group of people off to one side casting molds for the famous bells being sold here. They differed in age, sex, color – all of them smiling and most of them wearing Toms shoes. Here we go, I thought – another commune.

How to Survive a Road Trip

Planning for a road trip can be overwhelming. When you don’t have to pay fifty bucks to check your luggage, it’s tempting to just throw it all in the car. But, after a few trips, I learned that going this route leaves you with a car full of stuff, none of which is at arm’s length when you need it. Now that I’m more than a week in to my epic National Geographic adventure, I wouldn’t call myself a road trip expert (yet), but if I had to boil down what’s currently in my car even further to the top 10 essentials, here’s what would make the cut.

Curiosity. It’s why the first explorers set sail, why we built a rocket to the moon, and what moves each and every one of us to travel. The opposite of being curious is being bored, and we think being curious is a lot more fun. That’s why we’re sending Nat Geo Young Explorer and award-winning photojournalist Shannon Switzer on a quest to uncover off-the-beaten-path treasures as she wends her way around the American West this summer. The adventure begins Monday, June 4th. Follow Shannon’s journey here on the blog, on Twitter @CuriousTraveler, and on Instagram @ShannonSwitzer.

Comments Off

There’s no real way of describing the magical mystery that can be found at 606 South Elm Street in Greensboro, NC. Some call Elsewhere a “collective,” others a “playground.” Operations curator Valerie Wiseman calls it a “living museum.” But what kind of museum allows you to touch, play, build, nap, and create — and has a “ghost room”?

We’re sending one of our most popular bloggers out on the classic American road trip to uncover uncommon stories of everyday people who are bringing change to their own communities. Aric S. Queen = The Good Traveler, and the adventure begins on Monday, May 7th. Follow Aric’s journey on Intelligent Travel, Twitter @GoodTravelerNG and Instagram (@GoodTraveler) to get inspired, to be entertained, and to give him advice about what he should see and who he should meet as he blogs his way across the U.S.

Mention the Smoky Mountains, especially Gatlinburg, Tenn., and bears are probably the first thing that you’ll hear about. Black bears, to be exact. The nearby Great Smoky Mountains National Park is one of the last remaining places in the eastern United States where they can be found in the wild. But this Tennessee tourist town, where images, wood…

Cape Cod Road Trip

Summering on the Cape—a phrase that evokes visions of chinos and clambakes. Both can still be found on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, along with family-friendly beaches, a stunning national seashore, and top-notch lobster rolls. Before the weather starts to cool, take a long weekend road trip exploring the coastline, which winds past cedar shake homes and…

Road Trip: Summer Concerts

Traveler intern Daniel Bortz plans the ultimate summer road trip, cruising across the country in search of some of America’s best music festivals. Music lovers know there’s nothing better than a live concert on a cool summer night. And while many artists tour year-round, the summer months give bands and listeners alike a time to…

Classic NG Road Trip: Route 40 in 1961

[The Gray family's] station wagon odyssey from sea to sea totaled 17,000 miles, counting side trips. Near the village of State Road, Delaware, the author’s family chats with a State trooper. From the July 1961 issue of National Geographic Magazine, by Ralph Gray/NGS. Cross-country road trips are often seen as a rite of passage for…

Big Wheels Keep on Turnin’

Irv Gordon breaks a world record every time he gets behind the wheel of his 1966 Volvo P1800. The 67-year-old retired teacher has clocked more than 2 million miles (2,593,831 as of this writing) on the car…and he’s still driving it. He’s got the Guinness world record for “most miles driven by a single owner…