Tag archives for Robert Reid

Celebrating a Century of Dada in Zurich

Dada is art. Dada is anti-art. Dada is manifesto. Dada is jibberish. Dada is a costume so cumbersome one has to be carried when wearing it. Whatever Dada is, or isn’t, most agree it’s long dead. But not in Zurich, the avant-garde movement’s birthplace. Best known as an international banking hub, the city—Switzerland’s largest—has long turned a lukewarm shoulder to…

The Best of Intelligent Travel

We publish new articles and stories all the time on Intelligent Travel, but there are a few that really got your attention last year. In case you missed them, here are the 15 most popular posts of 2015.

The Art of the Quest: St. Lucia By Clarinet

Fake Elvis’s rose-colored shades are straight out of an old Starsky & Hutch episode. Behind him, a faded tapestry emblazoned with the real Elvis flaps in the breeze, while the King’s “Welcome to My World,” released in 1977 just months before his death, crackles through cranked boom box speakers. Soon Fake Elvis leans into a stance, then pumps…

Overnighter: Baker City, Oregon

Tucked between the Elkhorn and Wallowa mountains in northeastern Oregon, Baker City found form during an 1860s gold rush. Today, its Main Street is home to a strip of recently opened brewpubs, boutiques, and eateries, most of which are run by converts from Portland, California, and New York. That outsider influence—and old-timers who welcome change, and want to be a part of it—make the town of 10,000 well worth an overnight stop.

Thursday: ‘Best of the World’ Twitter Chat

Join @NatGeoTravel this Thursday for a live Twitter chat with Traveler features editor Amy Alipio (@amytravels), who will be revealing the magazine’s much anticipated Best of the World list for the first time. Find out National Geographic’s take on the 20 must-visit destinations of 2015—and add your own two cents about where travelers should set their sights in the new year by using #BestoftheWorld.

The Changing Face of Travel

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Traveler’s 30-year history coincides, roughly, with the rise of travel as a widespread phenomenon. As we celebrate the magazine’s anniversary, I asked a dozen movers and shakers in the Nat Geo Travel family to share the biggest changes they’ve seen in the past three decades—and their hopes for the future. Here’s what they had to say.

Sherlock’s Cheeky Switzerland

Meiringen is the ultimate pilgrimage site for Sherlock fans. Literally. In the story “The Final Problem,” Sherlock (along with his nemesis, Professor Moriarty) plunged to his death at Reichenbach Falls just outside the Swiss town.

#NGTRadar: Travel Lately

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The Radar—the latest and best from the travel blogosphere—is a regular feature on Intelligent Travel every other Wednesday. You can play, too. Follow us on Twitter @NatGeoTravel and tag your favorite travel stories #NGTRadar to help us find the crème de la crème on the Web. Here are our newest picks.

You Know You Wanna: Walla Walla

You can’t say “Walla Walla” aloud and not feel a bit happier. Try it. Though most of us haven’t given a thought to visiting this pleasingly alliterative town in southeastern Washington (population 32,000), increasingly visitors are driving the four hours from Seattle or Portland to see what’s there. Many arrive with a smirk or low expectations, but leave with plans to return. Here’s why.

The Ultimate Digital Detox: Walking

The digital detox bandwagon is growing these days. People are increasingly looking for vacations that offer a break not just from the daily grind at home or at the office, but from their smartphones. Quick tip: It’s not about where you go. Once we reach a destination, we have to make the same decisions as we do back home. The real way to disconnect–wherever you happen to be–is what writer Rebecca Solnit calls “the most obvious and the most obscure thing in the world.”

Offbeat Travel: Rebels With a Cause

Welcome to the Local Offbeat Travel Club. We’re the ones who consider “off the beaten track” to be less to do with where you are, than how you approach where you are. In other words, we never say “ooh, weird,” snap a photo, and then move on. Instead, we linger–to find out the “why.”

Travel Sketching: A Manifesto

The idea of documenting a trip through art isn’t a particularly new one. Aboard Captain Cook’s second voyage to the Pacific was oil painter William Hodges; artist Edward Wilson accompanied Robert Scott as he explored the Antarctic; even a 22-year-old Jacqueline Bouvier and her sister Lee completed sketches of their European tour in 1951. Three years ago, I decided to give this tradition a try. My first sketch was hastily drawn, with rows of capital Ls for windows and messy scribbles for trees, but I immediately noticed two effects the process had on me…