Tag archives for Robert Reid

Join @NatGeoTravel this Thursday for a live Twitter chat with Traveler features editor Amy Alipio (@amytravels), who will be revealing the magazine’s much anticipated Best of the World list for the first time. Find out National Geographic’s take on the 20 must-visit destinations of 2015—and add your own two cents about where travelers should set their sights in the new year by using #BestoftheWorld.

Traveler’s 30-year history coincides, roughly, with the rise of travel as a widespread phenomenon. As we celebrate the magazine’s anniversary, I asked a dozen movers and shakers in the Nat Geo Travel family to share the biggest changes they’ve seen in the past three decades—and their hopes for the future. Here’s what they had to say.

Meiringen is the ultimate pilgrimage site for Sherlock fans. Literally. In the story “The Final Problem,” Sherlock (along with his nemesis, Professor Moriarty) plunged to his death at Reichenbach Falls just outside the Swiss town.

#NGTRadar: Travel Lately

The Radar—the latest and best from the travel blogosphere—is a regular feature on Intelligent Travel every other Wednesday. You can play, too. Follow us on Twitter @NatGeoTravel and tag your favorite travel stories #NGTRadar to help us find the crème de la crème on the Web. Here are our newest picks.

You can’t say “Walla Walla” aloud and not feel a bit happier. Try it. Though most of us haven’t given a thought to visiting this pleasingly alliterative town in southeastern Washington (population 32,000), increasingly visitors are driving the four hours from Seattle or Portland to see what’s there. Many arrive with a smirk or low expectations, but leave with plans to return. Here’s why.

The digital detox bandwagon is growing these days. People are increasingly looking for vacations that offer a break not just from the daily grind at home or at the office, but from their smartphones. Quick tip: It’s not about where you go. Once we reach a destination, we have to make the same decisions as we do back home. The real way to disconnect–wherever you happen to be–is what writer Rebecca Solnit calls “the most obvious and the most obscure thing in the world.”

Welcome to the Local Offbeat Travel Club. We’re the ones who consider “off the beaten track” to be less to do with where you are, than how you approach where you are. In other words, we never say “ooh, weird,” snap a photo, and then move on. Instead, we linger–to find out the “why.”

The idea of documenting a trip through art isn’t a particularly new one. Aboard Captain Cook’s second voyage to the Pacific was oil painter William Hodges; artist Edward Wilson accompanied Robert Scott as he explored the Antarctic; even a 22-year-old Jacqueline Bouvier and her sister Lee completed sketches of their European tour in 1951. Three years ago, I decided to give this tradition a try. My first sketch was hastily drawn, with rows of capital Ls for windows and messy scribbles for trees, but I immediately noticed two effects the process had on me…

Since the fateful first edition of Patricia Schultz’s “1,000 Places to See Before You Die” was published in 2003–a few years before that Jack Nicholson-Morgan Freeman dying-buddy film would lend the concept a buzz-worthy name–”bucket lists” have hijacked popular discourse on travel. Here’s what’s wrong with that.

Too often, we travelers let good old fashioned guilt seep into the decision-making process when we’re building our itineraries. Rather than following our inherent interests (canoes, Rococo, hockey), we let the expectations of friends and family–or what we’ve read in some magazine–serve as some proxy “travel conscience,” guiding us toward things we should or shouldn’t see.

We publish new travel stories all the time on the Intelligent Travel blog network, but there are a few that really got your attention this year.

In case you missed them, here are the 13 most popular posts of 2013.

I get that we see New Year’s as a fresh start and all that, but are those life-changing resolutions such a good idea? Many people say no, and point to the failure rate of such promises–particularly the more pie-in-the-sky ones. Fortunately for us, travel resolutions are easier to keep–if you’re realistic about them. And though they might not take care of those love handles, they’re sure to make the next year of your life on Earth a lot more enjoyable.

Travel may not take us to water that replenish our strength or smooth out our wrinkles, but that doesn’t mean it isn’t a kind of “fountain of youth.” One way it works is by stretching time.

Many travelers opt for hop-on, hop-off tour buses to get a quick primer on a new place. As silly as it can look, and it does, it’s a useful way to get oriented when you’re visiting a destination for the first time. But there’s an alternative: biking.

My favorite travel film is probably “Yes Man,” a mostly forgettable 2008 film in which a troubled Jim Carrey vows to say “yes” to everything. What better travel lesson can a film possibly offer? Say “yes” as much as you can (even to two tickets to Cornhusker Central) — and go not with low expectations, but with no expectations.

I’ve been transcribing two boxes of travel journals I keep stashed under my desk. I’m far from finished, but a clear pattern has emerged. Wherever I was making my entry – geographically or mentally – one key part of the trip consistently escaped record: the return home.

No matter how many journals I fill, photos I take, tweets I send, I find that oftentimes I “document” the wrong things.

“Everyone on this train has borderline Asperger’s,” a self-described “double dork” announces somewhere in America. It’s a joke. Except no one disagrees. The speaker is Travis Korte, a data scientist/policy analyst who resembles Christian Bale with gentler features. He’s talking about his fellow passengers — a group of 24 creative, enviably sharp, and decidedly quirky youngsters — and their rail journey across the U.S. with the Millennial Trains Project.

You don’t really know a train until you’ve slept on one. And I don’t mean a half-hour doze between Philly and Baltimore but the real deal: a bunk in a berth, a sliding door with a latch lock, and those WWII-style knobs to turn off your reading light. And when you’ve really settled into a…

Trailing David Bowie

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If a life can be art, why can’t travel? As we brace for what comes next 40 years after Bowie famously retired his Ziggy Stardust persona on July 3, 1973, there’s no better way to uncover the man who sang about space, fame, and modern love than following in his footsteps.

Woody Allen’s New York

I used to sort of hate New York. I rooted against the Yankees and saw the “big city” as a scary place of noise, fast-talk, and blood-filled drama. Then I watched “Annie Hall.” And “Manhattan.” And “The Purple Rose of Cairo.”

Everyone’s talking about “traveling like a local” these days. Travelers, bloggers, tour operators, souvenir clerks, industry types in pleated slacks – they all seem to say it’s the best way to get to know a place. Go local or go home, right?

Well, not me.