The occasional brush with the occult or the unexplained isn’t enough to keep intrepid travelers at bay, and our Nat Geo Travel fans on Facebook were eager to share their most memorable paranormal experiences. Here are some of their picks—from the underworld of Paris to a —for the world’s spookiest destinations.

Love exploring new cities around the world? Join @NatGeoTravel’s Urban Insider and Orbitz travel editor Sarah Gorenstein for a live Twitter chat on Wednesday, November 5.

These ten notoriously frightful cities, near and far, are beset with ghastly, ghostly close encounters.

Numbers add up—just ask the Inion Eleven. Backed by a bounty of votes, this fearless family of global nomads takes the top spot in our 2014 People’s Choice Traveler of the Year contest.

The low down on the latest and greatest in travel literature from National Geographic Traveler’s #TripLit guru, Don George.

Not just the province of the dead and those who mourn them, cemeteries can be celebrated for all they offer the living. Europe boasts some of the most interesting and elaborate cemeteries in the world. Here are five of the most striking, all of which happen to be located in capital cities.

Researcher and artist Mimi Onuoha was living in Brooklyn…right before she found out she had been selected as one of five Fulbright-Nat Geo digital storytelling fellows. She’s since hopped the pond to London to explore how technology and culture influence and affect each other, but she’ll never get Brooklyn out of her soul. As she says, “you can’t help but find endearing a city that will offer you everything but only kind of heart you back.” Here are some of Mimi’s favorite things about NYC’s most populous borough.

#NGTRadar: Travel Lately

Travel Lately—a roundup of the best new dispatches from the travel blogosphere—is a regular feature on Intelligent Travel every other Wednesday. You can play, too. Follow us on Twitter @NatGeoTravel and tag your favorite travel stories #NGTRadar to help us find the crème de la crème on the Web. Here are our latest picks.

To many outsiders, the icons, costumes, and rituals associated with Mexico’s Day of the Dead festivities—held around All Saints and All Souls Days (November 1 and 2, respectively) in Oaxaca and other cities—seem macabre and ghoulish. Nothing could be further from the truth.

Traditionally we have molded our lives to accommodate the physical dictates of cities. That is changing—fast. Our cities increasingly are reflecting the architecture and aspirations of tomorrow in their buildings, street life, social connectivity, technologies, transportation systems—even how they welcome and entertain travelers.

#StrangePlanet: Travel Trivia

Truth is stranger than fiction. Here are seven travel factoids to help prove it.

Louisiana, Three Ways: Creole Country

The river town of Natchitoches dates back to 1714, when French traders paddling up the Red River from the Mississippi put down roots here, making it the oldest permanent settlement in the entire 828,000-square-mile Louisiana Purchase. It immediately impresses me as a downsize version of New Orleans’ Royal Street, with its filigreed iron balconies, antiques stores, and art galleries.