What do National Geographic staffers bring back from their travels? Here’s a peek into our baggage.

Truth is stranger than fiction. Here are five travel factoids to help prove it.

The Danish word smørrebrød translates simply as buttered bread, but anyone familiar with the open-face sandwich devoured at lunchtime throughout Copenhagen will consider that pure Nordic understatement.

Throwback Travel: Sledding in Central Park

The time this photo of sledders in Central Park hit newsstands in National Geographic magazine: December 1960. Meanwhile, on Broadway, audiences applaud the new Lerner and Loewe musical Camelot, and newly elected John F. Kennedy prepares to assume the American presidency. Here are a few other interesting intersections.

Even though Nicole Brewer hails from Detroit, Michigan, she has made the world her home. After stints in South Korea, Germany, and South Africa, Nicole decided to take a job as an English instructor in Nizwa, Oman. When she’s not at the head of the class, she’s hard at work building I Luv 2 Globetrot, a blog she co-founded with a…

National Geographic Traveler columnist Heather Greenwood Davis is the magazine’s family travel advocate, guru, and soothsayer. Here’s her latest advice.

There are some amazing events on tap all over the world, all the time. Here’s a taste of what you can see and do in February.

We publish new articles and stories all the time on Intelligent Travel, but there are a few that really got your attention last year. In case you missed them, here are the 14 most popular posts of 2014.

Just Back: Jackson Hole

Nat Geo staffer Erin Block just returned from a winter adventure in Jackson Hole, Wyoming. “As a rule, I’m a warm-weather person,” she says. “But one day I decided it was high time I stepped far out of my comfort zone.” That’s how she decided to try her hand at skiing for the first time—on some of the biggest and steepest slopes in the United States. The last word? “There was no better place to bundle up and leave the warm behind.”

Conservation photographer and National Geographic Explorer Carlton Ward, Jr., has been captivated by Florida’s Everglades National Park since he was a child, so much so that he’s made protecting it—and the amazing wildlife that lives there—his life’s work. Here’s a look at the ecological wonderland through his unique lens.

Planes, trains, and automobiles certainly provide travelers with an edge when it comes to getting the most mileage out of Europe’s dreamy, castle-flecked landscapes. But there’s a price to pay: We end up being passive observers, rather than participants in the journey itself. For an intimate travel experience alive with nature and a sense of history, train your sights on these five routes.

The staff at National Geographic Travel is continually criss-crossing the globe to uncover the best and the brightest places, but we have travel wish lists just like everyone else. Here’s where we want to go in 2015 and why.