There are few people living who know Yellowstone better than Jeremy Schmidt. The Jackson Hole-based writer and photographer has spent 40 years working there as a ranger, “winterkeeper,” and guide. Here’s his insider’s guide to America’s very first national park.

Paul Theroux has been charming readers–and rooting out surprising adventures in far-flung places–for more than half a century. Known for his fondness for train travel, love-hate relationship with Africa, and finesse with language, the veteran travel writer and novelist, now 73, continues to share his adventures with the world. When Theroux stopped by the Nat Geo offices last year, I had a chance to ask him about his thoughts on travel, his connection to his roots, and his advice for aspiring writers. This is what he had to say.

I set off from Miami without an agenda. I was headed south to Key West on the famous Overseas Highway and wanted to let serendipity lead the way. With only a short amount of time on my hands, I didn’t want to be saddled with an endless list of to-dos. Here’s what I found on my…

When Sharada Annamaraju moved to Hyderabad as a teenager, it wasn’t exactly love at first sight. But time and distance can change a person. Eight years (and one language learned) later, she decided to give the capital of Andhra Pradesh in southern India another chance. This time, sparks flew, and she isn’t leaving anytime soon. Here are a few of Sharada’s favorite things about the place she calls home.

#NGTRadar: Travel Lately

The Radar–the best of the travel blogosphere–is a regular feature on Intelligent Travel every other Wednesday. Follow us on Twitter @NatGeoTravel and tag your favorite travel stories #NGTRadar to help us find the crème de la crème on the Web. Here are our latest picks.

The Miami of today may not look like any place my grandparents would recognize–at least from the outside. But Magic City’s big heart and carousing spirit are here to stay.

I’ve heard the horror stories: Hours on end spent in a stuffy car desperately trying to get to some specific event (a wedding, a theme park) on time with a constant chorus of “Are we there yet?” emanating from the backseat. It doesn’t have to be that way. There are some key things you can do to make your next family road trip your best ever. Here are five to get you started.

Two years ago, National Geographic Traveler contributing editor Carl Hoffman shared with me an idea for his next book. It struck a chord because when I was ten I was drawn to the subject: the mysterious disappearance in 1961 of Michael Rockefeller in what was then Netherlands New Guinea. Did he drown? Was he shredded by a crocodile or shark? Or, most grisly, was he eaten by cannibals?

When to Boycott A Destination

I’ve traveled all around the world, and Uganda remains perhaps the most beautifully arresting place I have ever visited. So, when my husband and I began thinking of dream trips we could take this year, the chance for me to introduce him to what Winston Churchill called “the pearl of Africa” propelled the country to the top of my list. That was before Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni signed a bill that imposes prison terms for homosexual acts.

The homemade pierogi are spot-on and the borscht is rich with dill, just like in Ukraine. But the old country is thousands of miles away; I’m on a patch of Canadian prairie in Alberta, site of the biggest Ukrainian settlement outside of eastern Europe.

“Have a seat by the window; it’s better to watch the wildlife that way,” the host at Osteria del Teatro said with a wink as he led me to a table with a view. Before long, I was enjoying the show–a parade of people streaming toward Washington Avenue, one of the most happening thoroughfares in Miami’s…

Stephanie Hsu, who hails from New Jersey, relocated to Taipei on a “winter-break whim” and has never looked back. She now spends her days studying business at National Taiwan University and blogging about the place she calls home on her website, The Thousandth Girl. Here are a few of Stephanie’s favorite things about the city The Wall Street Journal’s China bureau described as “Asia’s answer to Portland, Oregon.”